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dwint

speedometer cable

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my speedometer stopped working on my 91 kq and took the plastic off but how do I replace it when its under the tank and you cant get the tank out unless you remove the engine

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    • By ATVNetwork
      It´s one debate that doesn´t seem to be going anywhere fast. If you´re buying a brand new winch like the Superwinch Terra 45 or maybe it is just time to replace your old cable. Which way do you go: steel or synthetic? Let´s take a look at the pros and cons so you can decide once and for all which is better for YOU.
       
      Life of the Cable
      After an extended period of time depending on use, a steel cable can start to crimp, get rust spots or develop frayed strands of steel cable which can give you nasty cuts and also decrease the reliability of the cable. In the short term, the steel cable can take a lot more abuse than the synthetic variety. However, synthetic cables can have a much longer life. That is of course only if it is taken care of and carefully prevented from fraying on the edges. Fraying edges on a synthetic cable is the beginning of the end for this more costly type of cable. The more affordable steel cables might be more attractive for the rugged wincher who doesn't mind replacing a steel cable at the first signs of wear.

      Potential and Kinetic Energy
      You don´t need to be a science major to recognize the danger of a cable under extreme tension. Whether it is due to overbearing the cable or a replacement cable is well overdue, it can be a potentially very dangerous situation. In terms of this, Synthetic is generally the winner as it doesn´t become a dangerous projectile. It is also easier on the hands and actually provides more pull per inch. Bear in mind however, that your maximum pulling power is still limited by the winch you select. It´s downside is that if it is in contact with a sharp edge, it has the possibility of slicing or fraying the edges, which is very unlikely with a steel cable.

      UltraViolet
      Some users of synthetic cable have made complaints about UV damage causing weakness that leads to a decrease in strength. Newer synthetic lines are being manufactured UV resistant, and a winch cover is also a cheap solution to this problem.
       
      Company Choice
      About 95% of new winches are being shipped by their companies with standard steel winch cables. This can be taken as just because they are the cheaper option of the two for them to make the most profit, or a signal that it is still the best choice of cable.

      Power
      As I mentioned before, Synthetic does provide you with more pounds per inch. Which means more pulling power for less cable. Even though pulling power is generally determined by the winch, check out this article with tips for both types of cables on how to double your pulling power.

      Conclusion:
      Synthetic is the latest and more expensive cousin, that still has a few kinks to iron out before it really replaces steel cables completely. Steel has been proven in every condition. It is tried and tested and cheaper. For reliability and cost, definitely your cable of choice.

      Author:
      Sam is an ATV enthusiast and updates his adventure website with outdoor tips and articles, including a review on the Superwinch Terra 45 (1145220)
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      I decided to go with Dyneema cable. My winch has a hole through the drum that widens on the back side. The new cable has no end, it's just cut off. I am worried that I will need a lot of line some day and pull to much out and end up with a cable no longer attached to the winch. I thought about knotting the cable after slipping it through so it couldn't come out but decided against it. I ended up tying a couple shoe strings near the end so I know to stop. I would rather have a better safeguard . What do you guys do?
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      On my 1988 Big Bear the shifter for high, low, reverse is supposed to have 2 cables connected to it, The main one (contol wire 1) is there and shifts it from high, low & reverse. Control wire 2 is missing, where does it connect to???? The machine works without it, but i want to replace it if it does something.
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