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Top 10 Vintage ATV collections

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      I know...I feel stupid for asking.  I find it impossible to use the thumb throttle with my thumb when I have the bars turned full right. I have to reach across the top and grab the throttle from the front with my fingers. It isn't very smooth and I can't help but think that there must be a technique, mod or adjustment for this. How do I get past this?
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