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qcm413

1987 Yamaha Big Bear 350 Grinding Noise Front Differential

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Hi,

Thanks for a newbie on this site !

i have grinding noise in my front differential. the front right wheel is turning and the left is try to turn but no movement and make sound like a gear broken. somebody have any idea ? not enough oil in diff ?

thank

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Added full ATV info and issue to topic title and moved to Yamaha ATV forum.

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i try to speak english sorry. je parle francais d'habitude ;)

im new on this site. 

my yfm350fwt 1987 have grinding noise inside front differential when i turn in mud. i know one seal is leaking and maybe the oil level is low. can this low oil level create this problem or its regular problem of this atv model ?

thanks

 

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I don’t think low oil would make a grinding noise.  I think low oil maybe caused a damaged gear and something is now broken causing a grinding noise like a differential ring gear or  pinion gear.  If you keep riding it most likely will get worse.  I would stop riding and take it apart. Maybe you will limit the damage now and only have to replace a few parts instead of all of the parts.   

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13 hours ago, qcm413 said:

i try to speak english sorry. je parle francais d'habitude ;)

im new on this site. 

my yfm350fwt 1987 have grinding noise inside front differential when i turn in mud. i know one seal is leaking and maybe the oil level is low. can this low oil level create this problem or its regular problem of this atv model ?

thanks

 

If oil can get out, mud and other crap can get in.  especially if its a cv boot

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Your Yamaha has a limited slip front diff.  When they get low on oil, they will tend to growl in a tight turn.

I'd drain the oil and refill with a good 80w90 gear oil.  The other thing that helps is adding 1 ounce of friction modifier, made specifically for limited slip diffs., to the oil.

Some of the gear oils have the friction modifier in the oil already. Royal Purple is one of them.  If you can't find one, the auto parts store should sell a 4oz. bottle of friction modifier.

The early Honda 4wd's were bad about chattering front diffs. also.

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