Quantcast
Jump to content

  • Join Today, It's Simple and FREE!

    As a member, you can post in our forums, upload your photos and videos, use and contribute to our downloads, create your own member page, add your ATV events, and even start your own ATV club to host your own club forum and gallery.  Registration is fast and you can even login with social network accounts to sync your profiles and content.

Recommended Posts

Press Release

Charlotte, NC

X-Tream Clean Products of Charlotte, NC is introducing a new brand to its stable of cleaning products with the addition of X-Factor Tire Prep. Using the newest and most advanced chemical technology available we have developed a line of tire treatment/preps/conditioners that can be used for any dirt and asphalt racing applications. X-Factor Tire Prep will soften rubber and synthetic compounds in tires allowing for increased amounts of grip, traction and softness that you desire. There are three versions of X-Factor Tire Prep to use based on track conditions, weather conditions and desired amount of softening and traction; X-Factor Hot, X-Factor Mild and X-Factor Cool. X-Factor Tire Prep can be used for karting, ATVs, UTVs, Rock Crawling, motorcycles and various forms of racing.

The X-factor Tire Prep line is a precise concentration formula that is ready to use, no dilution or mixing necessary. X-Factor Tire Prep will get heat to tires fast, provide adhesion, give you great bite and provide ultimate traction for lasting results. X-Factor Tire Prep can be baked, applied inside, applied on top with a brush, roller or sponge applicator. One of the most unique characteristics about X-Factor Tire Prep is that all three versions are non-flammable and VOC Compliant and X-Factor Hot is biodegradable.

X-Tream Clean Products develops cleaning products made specifically for MX bikes, ATVs, UTVs, karts or any off-road vehicle as well as tire conditioners for aiding in traction, grip and softness. For further information please visit wwwX-Tream Clean Products or www.tireprepx.com.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Topics

    • By MarkinAR
      What is the opinion on carb kits? What's one of the better brands of aftermarket? OEM is always preferred but not practical, chinese cheapie is never a good option. 
      Thoughts ?
    • By Frank Angerano
      I’ve decided to post  a thread on the process of cleaning a carburetor and what’s needed in order to do it properly.    There are some members that are new to this and are not very versed in doing so. I want to help and feel this might explain things better. I would hope this helps you along.     We all have our own little tricks of the trade so I’m sharing my process on how i break a carburetor down, clean, reassemble and adjust it to peak performance. I welcome any other members input on this topic.     List of things I use:   Safety glasses !!!   Rags.   I like to use old white Tee shirts or I buy and always have a few white pillow cases from the dollar store on hand. The cheap ones.     I like to use a frisbee turned      upside down like a bowl to keep the liquids to a minimum on spillage to the work bench.    A set of cleaning picks and brushes or a piece of bicycle break cable, I separate the strands and use them to clean out the tiny holes in the jets. (Pic attached)     A can of gum out  carburetor cleaner with the small red tube that attaches to the spray tip.  (Pic attached)   A can of compressed air, the kind used to clean out keyboards on computers. It also has the small red tube that attaches to the spray tip.  Or a compressor if you have one with a blow out tip.  (Pic attached)   A piece of clean hose that I can connect to the fuel line port on the carburetor to test the float operation. About 10 inches long.    A few Q tips.   The process: I like to put the pillow case down on the work bench and spread it out flat.   This really helps in being able to keep track of parts. Especially because it’s white.     I use the frisbee because it’s small enough to keep parts contained and durable enough to deal with the chemicals and any gas that will come out of the carburetor while opening it up.     It’s important to make sure you keep track of where everything came off and where the screws and parts all go back.     I like to start at the bottom and pull the bowl off. I immediately spray the inside of the bowl down with carb cleaner until its about half way full and set it aside.   Then I take the float out and check it for any fluid inside. If it’s a white color float you can hold a flashlight under it and see through it for any fluid inside.  If it black just shake it up and listen for fluid inside. No fluid inside is a good thing !    When the float comes out the fill valve needle will come with it. I take that needle and put it in the carburetor bowl that I filled with carburetor cleaner. This way it soaks for a bit. I do the same thing with the jets also once they are unscrewed and out toss them into the bowl to soak.    Take the air/fuel mixture screw out and soak that as well.  Side note: the air/fuel screw should have a screw, spring, washer and o ring.    After all the jets and parts are out and soaking I like to take the carburetor cleaner, use the small red tube and stick it in all the little holes/ports on the carburetor and spray.   I do this while it’s in the frisbee. This way there is no mess. I look to see where the spray pressure comes out on the other side of that port.   Once this is all done I start running my brushes and cleaning tips gently through all of the holes/ports and spraying it again with the carb cleaner.  After I feel I’ve seen a clear flow of fluid through all the openings I spray them with the can of air the exact way I did with the carburetor cleaner. This will blow out any left over junk that’s still in the carburetor.   Check the choke operation is working properly and spray it clean. Most choke devices are easily cleaned up so hit it and move on since they are mechanical and it’s just a matter of freeing them up, spraying with cleaner and lube.   There are multiple types of chokes but many of them for the most part are mechanically operated.    Once this is completed I wipe the entire carburetor down good and blow it clean and set aside.     I then start working on the jets one by one. Start by running the cleaning tips and brushes through all the tiny holes making sure they are all clean. Hit it with the carburetor cleaner and then air. I hold a flashlight to it when it’s done so I can make sure all of the holes are clear. I set all the jets aside on the work area.  Do the same thing for the float needle and air/fuel screw.    Now once this is all complete you can set the frisbee aside and start to reassemble the carburetor on the clean white surface.   I start by running a Q tip in where the fill needle sits into the carburetor. Some carbs have a small o ring that needs to be clean for proper seating of the fill needle.     Carefully reinstall the jets where they came from and do not strip or over tighten the jets and use the proper size screwdrivers when removing and reinstalling the jets.    Reinstall the air/fuel mixture screw and set it to what’s called out in the manual for that bike.    Install the float and fill needle assembly.    Now in order to test that float I like to take that piece of hose I mentioned and connect it to where the fuel line gets connected to the carburetor. I then turn the carburetor over to the upright position and blow into the hose. You should hear air coming out of the bottom of the carburetor. While blowing, lift the float up and the air should stop.  Let it go and the float should fall down opening the fill valve and you should hear air again.  The air should stop about 3/4 way up when raising that float while your blowing air into it.   If so then your good to go. If not make an adjustment    Set the carburetor down, take the bowl and empty it.   Clean it out and scrape/wipe any old junk inside and blow it out good.   There is a screw on the outside of the bottom of the bowl. Remove it and clean it out and reinstall.     Turn the carburetor over and reinstall the bowl. Tighten the screws in a crisscross pattern so the bowl seats evenly.     I like to put the hose on one more time and do a float test to make sure it’s opening and closing properly. All you have to do is blow into the hose and run the carburetor  upside down to see if the air stops.     Reinstall the carb and you should be good to go!    All pics of the items I use are attached below.   If you understand this great. If not ask away! Don’t be shy and don’t cut corners.   You will only wind up pulling the carburetor off of the bike for the third and forth time before you get it right.    The last thing to be discussed is dialing in the air/fuel screw when your finally put back together and running.  This is a relatively easy task.   Again I hope this helps!    Frank.     


    • By Frank Angerano
      I would like to hear who uses what to clean there ATV’S. 
      I’ve always been a fan of simple green and it’s always worked well but with this new property and the crazy black mud and clay that’s there  I have to say the simple green is not cutting it. 

      So from cleaning  right after a ride to cleaning them when you find one in a barn I would like to hear what everyone does and what your recommendations. 
      I’m looking to try something new.  
    • By Gilbey
      Does everyone run the tire pressure as stated on tires or perhaps a couple # below to soften the ride a little?
    • By Shawn Hurt
      I have a 2013 KQ I bought it new but rolled it a few years ago. I have replaced the left lower A-arm and left tie rod, the steering is still a little sketchy as I just eye balled the alignment. But the major issue is the left front tire cambers out at the top and has wore the tire bald. Tires have about 2000 miles on them but other 3 are half tread and left front is a slick.. I can not see anything else bent and don't know what to do..  
  • Similar Tagged Content

    • By xtreamclean
      Charlotte, NC - July 12, 2011
      Press Release - X-Tream Clean Products announces its sponsorship with Sunshine State Quad Series
      X-Tream Clean Products announces its sponsorship today with Sunshine State Quad Series of Leesburg, FL. Established in 2006 SSQSA was formed for the ATV racers of Florida to begin a dedicated ATV series during the typical winter months. Beginning this November SSQSA is coming back and ready to set the ATV world on fire. The SSQSA will be hosting a four race series that will begin in November 2011 and end in January 2012. They will have a total of 19 classes for riders of all ages and experience levels from the youngest 50cc riders to the Pro and Pro-Am classes. X-Tream Clean Products looks forward to our relationship with SSQSA and all of the participants that will be attending races this upcoming season.
      Sunshine State Quad Series of Leesburg, FL is run by Brett Jones who has been involved in promoting ATV racing for over 15 years. More information can be found at Home Page.
      X-Tream Clean Products based in Charlotte, NC develops and markets cleaning products specifically designed for motocross bikes, street bikes, ATVs, UTVs, bicycles and all related off-road, on-road and on-water machines as well as developing tire preps for dirt and asphalt racing applications. More information can be found at Welcome to XTream Clean.
    • By xtreamclean
      X-Tream Clean Products introduces a new product to the line-up in Reflect Chrome & Paint Renewer. Reflect is a new professional grade polishing compound that provides a deep shine to metals and painted surfaces. With its unique combination of lubricants and nanotechnology abrasives, Reflect will add shine and bring new life and color back to faded finishes. Reflect will remove oxidized pigment, road film, dirt, stains and minor scratches. This smooth lotion like product contains no harsh chemicals, no harsh abrasives and can be applied by hand or by orbital or rotary polisher. Cleans and shines metals, painted surfaces and chrome to give you maximum visual reflection in an easy on, easy off product. Great for rims, wheels, metals and any painted surfaces and chrome surfaces. Take the hassle of cleaning out of your hands and put it in XTC’s hands. Not designed for plastics.
      X-Tream Clean Products based in Charlotte, NC develops and markets cleaning products specifically designed for motocross bikes, street bikes, ATVs, UTVs, bicycles, karts and all related off-road, on-road and on-water machines as well as developing tire preps for dirt and asphalt racing applications under the brand name X-Factor Tire Preps. More information can be found at www.atvwash.com.
    • By mywifeknowseverythin
      Thanks to all our Sponsors we had a great event and great turn out!!!! I didnt take any of these pictures....I think its the first time EVER....Anyway....Ill post them as they come in....
      Thanks to all that participated,,,,Without you all we wouldnt have any Playgrounds.....
      Video from a Participant on a SWR ride
      [ame=http://www.vimeo.com/11258922]Sand Wizards Clean Up Apr 2010 on Vimeo[/ame]
      Video of a SWR Club Member and his buddy riding down from washington...
      [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BdgiRvp_hZM]YouTube - Big Dog Motorcycles @ Winchester Bay.wmv[/ame]








  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...