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xtreamclean

X-Tream Clean Products New Product Release - Impact Shine & Wax

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Press Release

July 21, 2009

X-Tream Clean Products based in Charlotte, NC has introduced a new product called XTC Impact Shine & Wax to our line-up of quality cleaning solutions designed for the powersports industry. XTC Impact Shine & Wax is another one of X-Tream Clean’s Spray, Hose, Dry, Ride program products that is quick and easy to use. XTC Impact Shine & Wax is a simple spray and rinse product that adds shine and water beading/repelling abilities to any powersports vehicle. Great for dirt and street motorcycles, ATVs, UTVs, autos, boats, RVs and trucks. XTC Impact Shine & Wax is an instant detailing spray that contains optical brighteners to maximize brilliance and reflection as well as providing a barrier that provides ultimate protection from the elements by bonding to the surface on contact for long lasting results. XTC Impact Shine & Wax can be used on trim, glass, rubber, plastic, metals, painted surfaces and clear coat surfaces. In minutes you can detail an entire truck or motorcycle with just a simple spray and rinse process that will not leave any dried white residue, haze or streak. Available in 32 oz spray, 1 gallon and 5 gallon containers.

X-Tream Clean Products develops and markets cleaning products designed specifically for the powersports industry. For further information please visit www.mxwash.com or email [email protected].

Impact_Shine_&_Wax_Front_label.png

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