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mywifeknowseverythin

A little Home movie for you Golf Cart Riders

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My Buddy in Virginia sent me a DVD last yr from the Trike Fest that they have in Haspin Indiana.....I took it and did a little High Light Clip of it....I forgot all about it until I was cleaning up my Puter yesterday.....:rolleyes:

Anyway,,,,Thought you might like to see some of the fun we have....

TF 06

Bud Lights and Red Lights!!!!!!!1

GET IT RAGGG!!!!!!!

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Great vids!!! Yep your son looks like he has it down. The sand looks awesome. I can't wait to be able to try it out.

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