Quantcast
Jump to content

  • Join Today, It's Simple and FREE!

    As a member, you can post in our forums, upload your photos and videos, use and contribute to our downloads, create your own member page, add your ATV events, and even start your own ATV club to host your own club forum and gallery.  Registration is fast and you can even login with social network accounts to sync your profiles and content.

jerod400ex

Benefits Of Synthetic ATV Oil

Recommended Posts



I run Mobil1 4T synthetic because its the most consistent oil I could find. Nearly every part store has it.

i might try tht i was just wonderin if it was better to use than standard oil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Synthetic wont break down as fast so it will stay "lubier" as rappy says for longer

ahh i see i thought bout switchin over to synthetic

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Synthetic wont break down as fast so it will stay "lubier" as rappy says for longer

LOL! I do say that...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Yes, synthetic is designed to not break down as fast, and usually has some additives in it.

* Moved thread to "This vs. That" forum, retitled for search to "Benefits Of Synthetic ATV Oil"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After about 5-6 rides I change my oil. Mobil 1 4T is readily available at most stores so thats what I use. Before my engine was rebuilt after those 5-6 rides my oil was pure black like diesel engine oil. Is that normal?

Sent from my SGH-T989 using Xparent Blue Tapatalk 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Regular oil has viscosity modifiers which break down sooner compared to synthetic oil which is the correct viscosity to begin with. For instance 10w40 oil is really 10w oil with additives to make it act like 40 oil. Over time, the additives break down leaving you with something closer to straight 10w. On the other hand synthetic oil is 10w40 to begin with and no additives are needed. And they say it lasts longer than the additives would.

Personally I use cheap oil and change it often rather than expensive oil I don't have to change for a long time. The idea is to keep the oil clean and the only way to do that is to change it. Of course changing synthetic oil often would be better, but much more expensive.

The slickness of oil is irrelevant. The viscosity is important. The oil must keep the bearings suspended or you'll have metal to metal contact. Cam bearings come to mind. If the oil is too thin, it won't hold the cam off the bearing. If the oil is too thick, the oil pump can't pump it up to the cam fast enough. So it doesn't matter how slick it is, its being the correct viscosity that matters. Being too slick will only mess up your wet-clutch and make it slip more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Regular oil has viscosity modifiers which break down sooner compared to synthetic oil which is the correct viscosity to begin with. For instance 10w40 oil is really 10w oil with additives to make it act like 40 oil. Over time, the additives break down leaving you with something closer to straight 10w. On the other hand synthetic oil is 10w40 to begin with and no additives are needed. And they say it lasts longer than the additives would.

Personally I use cheap oil and change it often rather than expensive oil I don't have to change for a long time. The idea is to keep the oil clean and the only way to do that is to change it. Of course changing synthetic oil often would be better, but much more expensive.

The slickness of oil is irrelevant. The viscosity is important. The oil must keep the bearings suspended or you'll have metal to metal contact. Cam bearings come to mind. If the oil is too thin, it won't hold the cam off the bearing. If the oil is too thick, the oil pump can't pump it up to the cam fast enough. So it doesn't matter how slick it is, its being the correct viscosity that matters. Being too slick will only mess up your wet-clutch and make it slip more.

Those are some really good points. I would say to at least change your oil every spring no matter how much you ride.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Topics

    • By Dra O
      posted a while back - it was running at one point - I have all the plastic shroud off - it's down to frame and engine now
      -fuel pump: when line from petcock is attached, no fuel comes out other side to carb; the line to the carb is open (can blow through it); I thought when I cranked engine that the pump would spit out fuel on other side but it does not; I removed fuel pump and opened it up - diaphragm looks good - but internal areas had lotsa calcification build up - I cleaned this out and dried it good - the clear plastic pieces (?diaphragms) aren't broken - the spring w/ steel ball on end moves freely; am putting it back on tomorrow; but can anyone answer about the pump? isn't it supposed to pump fuel through it... to other side... to carb? puzzling
      -along with fuel pump: I replaced petcock 3 weeks ago (gas tank had rusty fuel in bottom - cleaned it out prior to new petcock); when I turn petcock arrow NOT to on or reserve, fuel comes out of line; when I turn it to on or reserve, fuel doesn't come out; puzzling
      -I don't know what's on back of fuel pump - it's a valve that has a hose coming out of it - looks like it goes to engine/carb - I haven't traced this out yet - what is it?
      -can squirt gas on air filter and engine will run for 2-3 seconds then stop - fuel in top of carb (under diaphragm) does same
      -it likely needs carb rebuild - will get to this - but something isn't allowing fuel to get from fuel pump to carb
      -I THINK it has a mikuni model x carb - diaphragm is ID 26mm  OD 68mm - hard to find inexpensive diaphragm, I guess because it's a model x
      -last thing - I replaced solenoid due to old one clicking; I HAVE to be charging the battery or it won't start/turn over - battery just goes dead; but if charging, it'll turn over nicely; i'm guessing it's a bad battery
      -any help appreciated - I've never owned an ATV before - inherited this beast from grandparent in-law
    • By StolenATV
      1987 Suzuki LT 80 and 2007 Honda CRF 50 dirt bike stolen out of my driveway on July 4th. Anyone with info that recovers them will get $400 no questions asked.
      Thanks
      The post Suzuki LT 80 Quad And Honda Dirt Bike appeared first on STOLEN 911.
      View the full article
    • By raybob
      replacing carb,, the bigger line on right side top of carb does it just vent to the air,, cant find where to hook it up to also I want to check the oil and gear oil I checked the oil in motor and the rear end my question is looks like allen plug on left side of motor if you are setting on the 4 wheller, ps it hs a oli leak any help would be great. Ray in kentucky
    • By Shane Pillar
      Talk about what kind of atv you have and what you do with it.
    • By Rich1028
      Suzuki LT-F160 Quad Runner does not seem to run long on Reserve
      was out  riding and when tank got low,it ran funny,so we switched it over to reserve ...it ran for awhile then no more .
      pulled it back to parking lot,filled it up started and ran ok.
      what do I look at first?
      the valve,or is there a separate fuel line leading to the valve?

  • Similar Tagged Content

    • By mmgood
      Hey people
      Question for all, just picked a 1986 bayou 300 thinking of going synthetic any thoughts ?
    • By ATVNetwork
      It´s one debate that doesn´t seem to be going anywhere fast. If you´re buying a brand new winch like the Superwinch Terra 45 or maybe it is just time to replace your old cable. Which way do you go: steel or synthetic? Let´s take a look at the pros and cons so you can decide once and for all which is better for YOU.
       
      Life of the Cable
      After an extended period of time depending on use, a steel cable can start to crimp, get rust spots or develop frayed strands of steel cable which can give you nasty cuts and also decrease the reliability of the cable. In the short term, the steel cable can take a lot more abuse than the synthetic variety. However, synthetic cables can have a much longer life. That is of course only if it is taken care of and carefully prevented from fraying on the edges. Fraying edges on a synthetic cable is the beginning of the end for this more costly type of cable. The more affordable steel cables might be more attractive for the rugged wincher who doesn't mind replacing a steel cable at the first signs of wear.

      Potential and Kinetic Energy
      You don´t need to be a science major to recognize the danger of a cable under extreme tension. Whether it is due to overbearing the cable or a replacement cable is well overdue, it can be a potentially very dangerous situation. In terms of this, Synthetic is generally the winner as it doesn´t become a dangerous projectile. It is also easier on the hands and actually provides more pull per inch. Bear in mind however, that your maximum pulling power is still limited by the winch you select. It´s downside is that if it is in contact with a sharp edge, it has the possibility of slicing or fraying the edges, which is very unlikely with a steel cable.

      UltraViolet
      Some users of synthetic cable have made complaints about UV damage causing weakness that leads to a decrease in strength. Newer synthetic lines are being manufactured UV resistant, and a winch cover is also a cheap solution to this problem.
       
      Company Choice
      About 95% of new winches are being shipped by their companies with standard steel winch cables. This can be taken as just because they are the cheaper option of the two for them to make the most profit, or a signal that it is still the best choice of cable.

      Power
      As I mentioned before, Synthetic does provide you with more pounds per inch. Which means more pulling power for less cable. Even though pulling power is generally determined by the winch, check out this article with tips for both types of cables on how to double your pulling power.

      Conclusion:
      Synthetic is the latest and more expensive cousin, that still has a few kinks to iron out before it really replaces steel cables completely. Steel has been proven in every condition. It is tried and tested and cheaper. For reliability and cost, definitely your cable of choice.

      Author:
      Sam is an ATV enthusiast and updates his adventure website with outdoor tips and articles, including a review on the Superwinch Terra 45 (1145220)
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...