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witness7

1997 Yamaha Kodiak 4x4 400 - Carb

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I have a couple of questions again please. In cleaning the carb i took the needle valve out.... it had a string on it and a rubber ring and a small washer... I need to know for sure how these go back because they fell out of the carb when i took the needle valve out and I am not unsure of how they go back in I think the spring first slides onto the needle valve, but what comes next if so the washer or the rubber O ring? Next I noticed the breather that i purchased does not set tightly into the hose that comes out of the carb would that keep it from idleing correctly? cause i can put something against the hose and it trys to idle? right now though i have the float off cause gas is pouring out of the carb when i try to start it... Thank you in advance

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I called it a needle valve cause of not knowing much about atv's .. its not the needle valve that has the washer and small spring and 0-ring... I think its called a Idler anyways its not in the bowl where the float is at .. but its outside the bowl right beside the bowl on the bottom.... I took it out to clean it and a small washer and 0-ring fell out before i could tell which one came out first.... So if anyone could help me I would appreciate it...

I think its the 0-ring that goes in first and then the spring and then the washer goes on the idler jet? If someone that knows about these things would reply I sure would appreciate it... Thank you.

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What you took out is the mixture screw. Put spring on mixture screw, then washer, then O-ring. Holding the screw so that those parts don't fall off, insert it into hole. I hold the carb so I can insert the screw with tip up, that way the parts wont fall off. Make sure you lightly seat the needle valve and then back it out the same amount of turns it was originally. If you don't know what that adjustment was, you will have to find out. Usually somewhere around 2 1/2 turns on 660s. 1 1/2 on my 450 Kodiak. Good Luck

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Thanks for this post and answer.

I am trying to figure out how to "seat" this "pilot screw" (outside of the float bowl) before backing it out 2.5 turns.

This "pilot screw" can be screwed in so far that the tip can actually be seen coming through the hole in the bottom wall of the carburetor exit. And no, I am not talking about the "jet needle".

There is also a "pilot air jet" set screw on the left wall of the intake side of the carburetor. That needs to be adjusted correctly too. I have read posts that it should be 2 turns out from a soft seat. That screw has a definite seat.

Thanks for any help you can provide!

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it does stick in to the carb body when seated, spray some wd on it, and seat it LIGHTLY, don't tighten it like a screw or it will strip or break the little tip off in the body, back it out 2 turns and try it, if it will idle turn it in slowly till the rpms drop, then out till they drop, set it between, I don't know what your talking about on the pilot air jet unless youre talking about the screw that holds the slide up, if that's it it just pushes the slide up to give it more gas when the throttle is at rest.

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