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There is a huge debate in winches being bought for ATV's lately here is my opinion

well first the debate is what pound winch to get what brand and what to go with metal corded or the Synthetic winch i would go with a 2000 pound warn synthetic synthetic because the metal cord over time frays and the little metal wire poke out and stab the crap out of your hands and can even cut you really good if your not careful I ride with riding gloves but i don't use metal cord because i don't want to have to put on leather gloves just to use my winch on a trail synthetic doesn't fray and is easier on the winch its self not as much friction when unspooling let me know what you guys use what brand weight rating and synthetic or metal cord

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