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  1. Why is it important to have an ATV Winch you may ask? If your ATV gets stuck in the mud, you can attach the winch cable or rope from your ATV winch to lets say a nearby tree, or something else that can act like a large anchor, to then pull yourself out. You can also help get your friend's ATV out of the mud if they get stuck, and be a hero! It's also a must have in the winter, if you have a plow... An ATV winch is a must have accessory for most 4WD ATVs, especially if you plan on riding in areas where you may get stuck or need to help a buddy out of a pit. Sure an ATV tow rope might work for that, but it sure is nice to have a winch ready to go and provide that pulling power when needed. If you are debating a synthetic line vs steel cable, read up on the difference, pros, and cons of each. We have an article explaining some of this from a few years back here. Some 2WD utility quads can also make use of a winch. In most cases a 1500lb ATV winch is just fine. If you are moving up to some of the larger ATVs and UTVs and want more power, you can move up to a 2,000lb or 3,500lb winch, depends on what you want to spend really. There are a few good buys under $100 you can find on Amazon today, that will get you going. We wanted to showcase and share a few of these with you. CASTOOL Electric Winch 12 V Recovery ATV/UTV Winch Kits Wire Remote Control 3000LBS Capacity Easy Handling And Comfortable Use With Remote Control, Take-up And Release The Rope Automatically Prepared For Mounting Onto a Vehicle Building Boat ATV etc. Permanent Magnet Motor Draws Less Current, Idea For ATV Use 3000lb 12 V Winch With Reliable Engine incl. Overheat Shutoff Strong Steel Cable Compare Others 6000LBS , Mounting Kit And Plugs Plus Remote Inclusive Single-Stage Planetary Gear System For Fast Line Speed Automatic Load-Holding Brake For Maximum Safety,More Convenience And Secure Steel Cable and Hook Currently $98.99 on Amazon ORCISH 12V 3500lb Electric Winch ATV UTV Synthetic Rope Winch Kits Comes with 2PCS Remote Wireless Control +1 pair of gloves A good quality hook and 4-way roller fairlead 3 stage planetary gearing system Specially designed for ATV,Corrosion resistant Sealed low amperage permanent magnet motor Currently $99.90 on Amazon Get the steel cable version for $88.99 Offroad Boar 3500Lbs Electric Winch for ATV/UTV Boat (Stainless Steel) Comes with a good quality hook and 4-way roller fairlead 3 stage planetary gearing system Specially designed for ATV Free spooling clutch for fast Steel Wire Rope payout Sealed low amperage permanent magnet motor Currently on Amazon for $88.90 Its also worth noting that ebay has a few ATV winches under $100 you can check out as well. Some of these are: NOTE: The ORCISH is the same price on ebay as it is on Amazon There was also a pretty good $100 rebate from Warn, but that ended in May. Be on the lookout for manufacturer rebates and search online for deals. If you see some good deals under $100, please post in our comments. 🤑
  2. Why is it important to have an ATV Winch you may ask? If your ATV gets stuck in the mud, you can attach the winch cable or rope from your ATV winch to lets say a nearby tree, or something else that can act like a large anchor, to then pull yourself out. You can also help get your friend's ATV out of the mud if they get stuck, and be a hero! It's also a must have in the winter, if you have a plow... An ATV winch is a must have accessory for most 4WD ATVs, especially if you plan on riding in areas where you may get stuck or need to help a buddy out of a pit. Sure an ATV tow rope might work for that, but it sure is nice to have a winch ready to go and provide that pulling power when needed. If you are debating a synthetic line vs steel cable, read up on the difference, pros, and cons of each. We have an article explaining some of this from a few years back here. Some 2WD utility quads can also make use of a winch. In most cases a 1500lb ATV winch is just fine. If you are moving up to some of the larger ATVs and UTVs and want more power, you can move up to a 2,000lb or 3,500lb winch, depends on what you want to spend really. There are a few good buys under $100 you can find on Amazon today, that will get you going. We wanted to showcase and share a few of these with you. CASTOOL Electric Winch 12 V Recovery ATV/UTV Winch Kits Wire Remote Control 3000LBS Capacity Easy Handling And Comfortable Use With Remote Control, Take-up And Release The Rope Automatically Prepared For Mounting Onto a Vehicle Building Boat ATV etc. Permanent Magnet Motor Draws Less Current, Idea For ATV Use 3000lb 12 V Winch With Reliable Engine incl. Overheat Shutoff Strong Steel Cable Compare Others 6000LBS , Mounting Kit And Plugs Plus Remote Inclusive Single-Stage Planetary Gear System For Fast Line Speed Automatic Load-Holding Brake For Maximum Safety,More Convenience And Secure Steel Cable and Hook Currently $98.99 on Amazon ORCISH 12V 3500lb Electric Winch ATV UTV Synthetic Rope Winch Kits Comes with 2PCS Remote Wireless Control +1 pair of gloves A good quality hook and 4-way roller fairlead 3 stage planetary gearing system Specially designed for ATV,Corrosion resistant Sealed low amperage permanent magnet motor Currently $99.90 on Amazon Get the steel cable version for $88.99 Offroad Boar 3500Lbs Electric Winch for ATV/UTV Boat (Stainless Steel) Comes with a good quality hook and 4-way roller fairlead 3 stage planetary gearing system Specially designed for ATV Free spooling clutch for fast Steel Wire Rope payout Sealed low amperage permanent magnet motor Currently on Amazon for $88.90 Its also worth noting that ebay has a few ATV winches under $100 you can check out as well. Some of these are: NOTE: The ORCISH is the same price on ebay as it is on Amazon There was also a pretty good $100 rebate from Warn, but that ended in May. Be on the lookout for manufacturer rebates and search online for deals. If you see some good deals under $100, please post in our comments. 🤑 View full post
  3. utvs It didn’t take long for Polaris to add a pair of seats to the Pro XP. The 2020 Polaris Pro XP 4 ups the ante in the battle for four-seater supremacy in the UTV wars. WIth 181 hp and a 125-inch wheelbase this thing is a beast. View the full article
  4. utvs Kawasaki finally has a dog in the fight. After years of anticipation, the Kawasaki Teryx KRX 1000 sport side-by-side has finally arrived following five years of research and development. View the full article
  5. Feds to open Utah’s national parks to ATVs; advocates fear damage, noise they may bring The roar of ATVs could be coming to a Utah national park backcountry road near you under a major policy shift initiated by the National Park Service without public input. Across the country, off-road vehicles like ATVs and UTVs are generally barred from national parks. For Utah’s famed parks, however, that all changes starting Nov. 1, when these vehicles may be allowed on both main access roads and back roads like Canyonlands National Park’s White Rim and Arches’ entry points from Salt Valley and Willow Springs. The move was ordered Tuesday by the the National Park Service’s acting regional director, Palmer “Chip” Jenkins, who directed a memo to Utah park superintendents instructing them to align their regulations with Utah law, which allows off-road vehicles to travel state and county roads as long as they are equipped with standard safety equipment and are registered and insured. “This alignment with state law isn’t carte blanche to take their ATVs off road,” said agency spokeswoman Vanessa Lacayo. “If people [drive] off road, they will be cited. Protection of these resources is paramount.” Under the rule change, off-highway vehicles could roam Canyonlands’ Maze District and Arches’ Klondike Buffs — as long as they remain on designated routes. In general, ATVs would be allowed to travel roads that are open to trucks and cars. The directive, which applies only to Utah parks, triggered an immediate backlash from conservation groups, which predicted the move will result in a “management nightmare” for parks already struggling with traffic jams and parking clutter. Now the park service is inviting a whole new category of vehicle onto park roads, establishing new uses that will disrupt wildlife and other visitors’ enjoyment, warned Kristen Brengel, the National Parks Conservation Association’s vice president of government affairs. “These are national parks that have incredible resources, cultural resources, natural resources, and so by allowing these vehicles that are tailored to go anywhere, you’re potentially putting these resources at risk,” Brengel said. “The park service should be going through a public process, doing an analysis and making sure they can adequately protect the park and its resources and visitors. They haven’t done that.” Brengel said her group is conferring with its attorneys to consider its options to block the rule change. Setting the stage for this change in policy was SB181 enacted by Utah lawmakers in 2008, authorizing any “street-legal” vehicle on all state and county roads. For the past 11 years, the National Park Service has pushed back, closing park roads to these recreational vehicles under the rationale that it is too easy to drive them illegally off the roads. “The addition of off-road vehicle traffic on park roads will inevitably result in injury and damage to park resources. These specialized vehicles are designed, produced and marketed for the purpose of off-road travel, and they are uniquely capable of easily leaving the road and traveling cross country,” states a 2008 park service memo explaining why Arches and Canyonlands should remain off-limits to ATVs. “No reasonable level of law enforcement presence would be sufficient to prevent ATV and OHV use off roads. Park rangers will have no ability to pursue and apprehend vehicle users off road without adding to the damage they cause to park resources.” When Utah enacted SB181, all-terrain vehicles, which ride like a four-wheeled motorcycle, were the most used off-road vehicle. UTVs, or so-called utility terrain vehicles, equipped with side-by-side bucket seats, steering wheels, robust suspension and roll cages, have since eclipsed ATVs in popularity, as well as their ability to create impacts. They can be operated at higher speeds and can be so loud that occupants wear ear protection. Jenkins, who served most recently as the superintendent of Mount Rainier National Park, issued the directive after off-highway groups and Utah lawmakers led by Rep. Phil Lyman, R-Blanding, pressured the Interior Department to lift the prohibition. In a Sept. 2 letter to Interior Secretary David Bernhardt, Lyman wrote that he is "offended" that the park service discriminates against off-highway vehicle owners, noting than nearly all of Utah's national parks are accessed from state and county roads. “The owners of street-legal OHVs comply with numerous laws and regulations to be given the privilege to drive on a wide range of state and county roads,” he wrote in the letter, signed by 13 other Utah lawmakers. “They also contribute to the maintenance of the state highway system through gasoline taxes and registration fees.” Lyman is the former San Juan County commissioner who became a political celebrity after organizing an off-road vehicle protest ride though Recapture Canyon, which resulted in misdemeanor convictions, 10 days in jail and a reputation as a public lands warrior. Adding pressure were UTV Utah and Utah OHV Advocates. According to the groups, Utah is home to 202,000 registered OHVs, or off-highway vehicles, the broad category that includes UTVs and ATVs. “Despite being one of the largest groups of public land users, and even though the economic benefit of our community dwarfs most other recreational users combined, we often find ourselves discriminated against by decision-makers that head public land agencies,” the groups’ presidents, Bud Bruening and Brett Stewart, wrote in a joint July 29 letter to Bernhardt. “In Utah, this discrimination is particularly acute when it comes to the National Park Service.” Many southern Utah county commissioners had lobbied for this change in the hopes of widening riders’ options for roaming Utah’s public lands. Counties maintain many of these back roads, according to Newell Harward, a Wayne County commissioner who welcomed the rule change. “We are happy with it,” said Harward, whose county includes Capitol Reef National Park and Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. “It will increase some tourism issues with folks who want to use some of these roads with street-legal UTVs. I don’t know the difference between those and small Jeeps [which had always been allowed]. I’m hoping people will pay attention to the laws and stay on roads. If they don’t, then this is going to get backed up.” Glen Canyon had already loosed its rules a few years ago, when it developed a new travel plan allowing ATVs on roads around Circle Cliffs. But that was only after a public process, an environmental review and a final decision that has yet to be formally implemented, according to Neal Clark, staff attorney with the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance. “UTVs are built for one reason, which is off-road use. That is the purpose for the existence of these machines,” Clark said. “They’re loud and obnoxious and because of that they’re completely contrary to the reasons that people travel from across the globe and across the country to visit national parks.” Article Source: https://www.sltrib.com/news/environment/2019/09/28/feds-open-utahs-national/
  6. Feds to open Utah’s national parks to ATVs; advocates fear damage, noise they may bring The roar of ATVs could be coming to a Utah national park backcountry road near you under a major policy shift initiated by the National Park Service without public input. Across the country, off-road vehicles like ATVs and UTVs are generally barred from national parks. For Utah’s famed parks, however, that all changes starting Nov. 1, when these vehicles may be allowed on both main access roads and back roads like Canyonlands National Park’s White Rim and Arches’ entry points from Salt Valley and Willow Springs. The move was ordered Tuesday by the the National Park Service’s acting regional director, Palmer “Chip” Jenkins, who directed a memo to Utah park superintendents instructing them to align their regulations with Utah law, which allows off-road vehicles to travel state and county roads as long as they are equipped with standard safety equipment and are registered and insured. “This alignment with state law isn’t carte blanche to take their ATVs off road,” said agency spokeswoman Vanessa Lacayo. “If people [drive] off road, they will be cited. Protection of these resources is paramount.” Under the rule change, off-highway vehicles could roam Canyonlands’ Maze District and Arches’ Klondike Buffs — as long as they remain on designated routes. In general, ATVs would be allowed to travel roads that are open to trucks and cars. The directive, which applies only to Utah parks, triggered an immediate backlash from conservation groups, which predicted the move will result in a “management nightmare” for parks already struggling with traffic jams and parking clutter. Now the park service is inviting a whole new category of vehicle onto park roads, establishing new uses that will disrupt wildlife and other visitors’ enjoyment, warned Kristen Brengel, the National Parks Conservation Association’s vice president of government affairs. “These are national parks that have incredible resources, cultural resources, natural resources, and so by allowing these vehicles that are tailored to go anywhere, you’re potentially putting these resources at risk,” Brengel said. “The park service should be going through a public process, doing an analysis and making sure they can adequately protect the park and its resources and visitors. They haven’t done that.” Brengel said her group is conferring with its attorneys to consider its options to block the rule change. Setting the stage for this change in policy was SB181 enacted by Utah lawmakers in 2008, authorizing any “street-legal” vehicle on all state and county roads. For the past 11 years, the National Park Service has pushed back, closing park roads to these recreational vehicles under the rationale that it is too easy to drive them illegally off the roads. “The addition of off-road vehicle traffic on park roads will inevitably result in injury and damage to park resources. These specialized vehicles are designed, produced and marketed for the purpose of off-road travel, and they are uniquely capable of easily leaving the road and traveling cross country,” states a 2008 park service memo explaining why Arches and Canyonlands should remain off-limits to ATVs. “No reasonable level of law enforcement presence would be sufficient to prevent ATV and OHV use off roads. Park rangers will have no ability to pursue and apprehend vehicle users off road without adding to the damage they cause to park resources.” When Utah enacted SB181, all-terrain vehicles, which ride like a four-wheeled motorcycle, were the most used off-road vehicle. UTVs, or so-called utility terrain vehicles, equipped with side-by-side bucket seats, steering wheels, robust suspension and roll cages, have since eclipsed ATVs in popularity, as well as their ability to create impacts. They can be operated at higher speeds and can be so loud that occupants wear ear protection. Jenkins, who served most recently as the superintendent of Mount Rainier National Park, issued the directive after off-highway groups and Utah lawmakers led by Rep. Phil Lyman, R-Blanding, pressured the Interior Department to lift the prohibition. In a Sept. 2 letter to Interior Secretary David Bernhardt, Lyman wrote that he is "offended" that the park service discriminates against off-highway vehicle owners, noting than nearly all of Utah's national parks are accessed from state and county roads. “The owners of street-legal OHVs comply with numerous laws and regulations to be given the privilege to drive on a wide range of state and county roads,” he wrote in the letter, signed by 13 other Utah lawmakers. “They also contribute to the maintenance of the state highway system through gasoline taxes and registration fees.” Lyman is the former San Juan County commissioner who became a political celebrity after organizing an off-road vehicle protest ride though Recapture Canyon, which resulted in misdemeanor convictions, 10 days in jail and a reputation as a public lands warrior. Adding pressure were UTV Utah and Utah OHV Advocates. According to the groups, Utah is home to 202,000 registered OHVs, or off-highway vehicles, the broad category that includes UTVs and ATVs. “Despite being one of the largest groups of public land users, and even though the economic benefit of our community dwarfs most other recreational users combined, we often find ourselves discriminated against by decision-makers that head public land agencies,” the groups’ presidents, Bud Bruening and Brett Stewart, wrote in a joint July 29 letter to Bernhardt. “In Utah, this discrimination is particularly acute when it comes to the National Park Service.” Many southern Utah county commissioners had lobbied for this change in the hopes of widening riders’ options for roaming Utah’s public lands. Counties maintain many of these back roads, according to Newell Harward, a Wayne County commissioner who welcomed the rule change. “We are happy with it,” said Harward, whose county includes Capitol Reef National Park and Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. “It will increase some tourism issues with folks who want to use some of these roads with street-legal UTVs. I don’t know the difference between those and small Jeeps [which had always been allowed]. I’m hoping people will pay attention to the laws and stay on roads. If they don’t, then this is going to get backed up.” Glen Canyon had already loosed its rules a few years ago, when it developed a new travel plan allowing ATVs on roads around Circle Cliffs. But that was only after a public process, an environmental review and a final decision that has yet to be formally implemented, according to Neal Clark, staff attorney with the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance. “UTVs are built for one reason, which is off-road use. That is the purpose for the existence of these machines,” Clark said. “They’re loud and obnoxious and because of that they’re completely contrary to the reasons that people travel from across the globe and across the country to visit national parks.” Article Source: https://www.sltrib.com/news/environment/2019/09/28/feds-open-utahs-national/ View full post
  7. Get ready! We're bringing the world‑renowned Nitro Circus to the Glamis dunes for not one, but three exclusive boundary‑breaking shows! This is a Camp RZR you don't want to miss. By pre‑registering, you get reserved access to the show and are automatically entered to win one of the Grand Prize Giveaways! Pre‑registering will get you on the list, but be advised that the first 100 people to check-in at Camp RZR Friday, October 25th will get closest to the action with premium viewing for the Saturday night show. Learn More Register Now RZR Vehicles Shop Accessories Shop Apparel Explore All Off-Road Vehicles
  8. Introducing the 2020 Yamaha XT-R editions of ATV and Side-by-Side vehicles featuring exclusive XT-R features like a factory-installed Warn Winch, advanced suspension, special-edition paint and color-matched wheels with extreme terrain tires, all Assembled in the USA for unmatched Proven Off-Road capability, comfort, and confidence. YXZ1000R SS XT-R: https://yamaha.us/yYXZXTR Wolverine X2 XT-R: https://yamaha.us/yX2RSXTR Wolverine X4 XT-R: https://yamaha.us/yX4XTR Grizzly EPS XT-R: https://yamaha.us/yGrizXTR
  9. Introducing the 2020 Yamaha XT-R editions of ATV and Side-by-Side vehicles featuring exclusive XT-R features like a factory-installed Warn Winch, advanced suspension, special-edition paint and color-matched wheels with extreme terrain tires, all Assembled in the USA for unmatched Proven Off-Road capability, comfort, and confidence. YXZ1000R SS XT-R: https://yamaha.us/yYXZXTR Wolverine X2 XT-R: https://yamaha.us/yX2RSXTR Wolverine X4 XT-R: https://yamaha.us/yX4XTR Grizzly EPS XT-R: https://yamaha.us/yGrizXTR View full post
  10. The 2019 ATV Motocross National Championship, an AMA National Championship, concluded on Friday, August 23 at Ironman Raceway. The season finale was held in conjunction with the Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship Series. View the full article
  11. This past weekend the 2019 ATV Motocross Championship (ATVMX) Series, an AMA National Championship, took over Loretta Lynn Ranch in Hurricane Mills, Tennessee. Hot and humid conditions greeted the AMA Pro ATV athletes, and the cloud coverage that graced the facility seemed to disperse as the riders lined the gate for moto one. Eighteen riders took to the gate for the penultimate round of racing. View the full article
  12. In another incredibly close points battle, the 2019 ATV Motocross National Championship (ATVMX) Series, an AMA National Championship, has once again taken an amazing turn. View the full article
  13. At this weekend’s seventh round of the 2019 ATV Motocross National Championship (ATVMX) Series, an AMA National Championship, Phoenix Racing Honda/Maxxis/Elka Suspension’s Joel Hetrick claimed the overall win with a two moto sweep that featured incredible racing here at Unadilla MX. View the full article
  14. The 2019 ATV Motocross National Championship Series (ATVMX), an AMA National Championship, headed to Sunset Ridge MX in Walnut, Illinois for the sixth AMA Pro round and fifth amateur ATVMX round. View the full article
  15. Phoenix Racing Honda/Maxxis Tires/Elka Suspension’s Joel Hetrick would seem to be all but unstoppable at Muddy Creek Raceway as round five of the 2019 ATV Motocross National Championship (ATVMX), Series, an AMA National Championship, took on a very demanding and rough track. View the full article

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