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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/22/2021 in all areas

  1. Gotta love Facebook Marketplace, and the crackheads that you can buy things from on there... Naturally, I'm like "Hook up the trailer, let's go get this pile of eBay parts!" and hauled ass to this dude's house with 3 crisp Benjamins to wave under his nose. Showed up about 20 minutes early to find him and his buddy hastily reassembling the pile of plastics into a semi-presentable quad, using some real sweet bulk bin galvanized hex bolts from Tractor Supply Racing Co. Looked it over and handed him the three bills in exchange for a transferrable registration from 11 years ago, and a STACK of handwritten bills of sale from the last 11 years, since apparently no one has gotten it functional (for long). Average ownership period ranges from 6 months to 2 years. Fingers crossed, lads! Got it home, and hit it with a healthy dose of bike wash and the pressure washer, more bike wash, a lot of scrubbing, and more pressure washing to get years worth of crud off of it. The entire left side of the crankcase was covered in an eighth inch of caked oil mud, as though there had been a catastrophic loss of oil at some point in the past, because it was nowhere near the drain or fill holes. Totally opposite side. Managed to find the VIN hiding in there and ran it for giggles. PO mentioned that he "had it running at the beginning of the season, but it was 'rough' " and that he had cleaned the carb, but it didn't help much. And now it just plain wouldn't fire at all. Kind of threw his hands up and shrugged. So, after cleaning it up enough to turn wrenches without looking like a Texas oilman, I took off the plastics and started poking around. Found a few fishy spots in the harness where previous attempts at repairs had been shoddily made and hidden with black tape. Sorted those out, drained and filled with fresh oil and a filter, and hooked up a battery. Turned the key, got a green light, hit the starter switch and got a little grunt and squeak out of it, then nada. No light, no nothing. Pulled out the DeOxIt D5 and started pulling apart all the connectors and giving them the business. put everything back together again, turned the key, got green light, and starter cranked! Then nothing again. Started fiddling with the wiring and connections while watching the green light, and saw a flicker when I bumped the 25A fuse holder. Gave it a squeeze, and sure enough, the light came on. Thing was full of powdered remains of spade terminals, so I installed a NOS replacement model from RADIO SHACK that had been swimming around in my toolbox for nigh a decade. Sure of my fix, I tried the starter again, and NOTHING again. More fiddling revealed that the OTHER fuse holder (15A) was the same. Homebrewed another fuse holder from spade connectors and shrink tubing, hooked it all up and everything was good. Now that I could crank it, I poured a couple cups of gas in the tank and pulled the plug to check for spark. Good blue spark, once I cleaned up the theretofore fouled plug and gapped it. Screwed it back in, with a healthy dose of ether, and gave it a crank. Not even a wheeze or a sputter. Off with the carb! So, I think our old friend PO has a drastically different definition of "carb cleaning" than I do. I'm thinking maybe he wiped down the OUTSIDE of the thing, and was shocked that it had little to no result. That white stuff is a combination of powdered aluminum oxide and near-varnish fuel. Has the consistency of slight dried mayonnaise or white library paste, but no pleasant wintergreen aroma to match. A quick perusal of the Amazon bargain bin turned up a carb (BST31SS) and non-vacuum petcock for $25, with a caveat that the carb required minor modifications to fit. Four days and a lot of sandblasting and surface prep on the plastics while I waited, the carb arrived today and I drilled out the ferrules for the choke and throttle cables to accept slip-fit cables instead of thread-ins. Other than that, the only difference was a lack of one vacuum port for the petcock, which I had anticipated and purchased a regular old one with no vac diaphragm in it. Safety first, amirite? Now with definite spark, and reliable fuel delivery, I started cranking and fiddling with the idle and air screws, managed to get it to fire up - almost literally~ There was a LOT of smoke coming from near the exhaust port on the head, thought I had loose header studs for a minute, then realized it was just more of the old oil mud I had missed while cleaning, burning off between the fins on the head and the exhaust heat shield. First fire up - lots of smoke While I was changing the oil, I took the opportunity to pull off the access covers and adjust the clutch and valve lash, so I was feeling OK about running it a little more. Got the idle and mixture set a bit better and decided to test out the transmission and shifting a little. Testing reverse Realized I left the parking brake set, so it stalled out. Oops. Another thing I did while waiting for Brown Suit Santa to bring my carb was to remove the diff lockout pin from the shifting mechanism and I wanted to see if it worked. Here's the quad, up on the lift, minus the LF wheel (due to a seized cylinder I've since replaced) with range set to HIGH, and Differential Lock engaged. Worked like a charm. Had to holler at the dog who was camped out below the rear tire Dog under the tire. Again. I think she has a death wish. Or perhaps aspirations of being a jackstand in the pro-leagues. Testing Diff Lock in High Range Put the wheel cylinder in, (Dorman w38750 for a 1991 Geo Metro/Suzuki Swift was a precise fit and only $10) to replace this crusty POS: put the wheel and hub back together, put seat back on and fired it up. Made sure it would start again after turning it off. Long Live The King All the repairs appear to have been successful all around! I took it out for a quick rip up the street and back, needs a little bigger main jet (it came with a 145 installed, which I swapped out for the 120 OEM spec, but it feels boggy at WOT, so I'm going to experiment a little after I get the airbox back together, but 145 seems like a big jump. I'll try to post an update once I have the plastics all refinished and installed next week. Pretty sure it's going to be yellow, no camo or green bullshit for me thanks Hope you didn't hate my post.
    2 points
  2. Looks like soooo much fun! Cant wait to get my family into this! Thanks for posting pics look amazing!
    2 points
  3. Yeah, very impressive and nice find! Those king quads last forever, my friend had one years ago and bought one in pretty good shape not too long ago.
    2 points
  4. Nice post! You may as well start sourcing a regulator. I recommend Ricks https://ricksmotorsportelectrics.com/ Get the biggest one they offer. I think mine is for a Triumph and will handle 50 amps. And a 250S cam will bring out the HP without sacrificing the low end too much. With those low gears it doesn't really matter.
    2 points
  5. Machines that have been sat for that long tend to rust up internally with many years of moisture and no oil flow around things. They might require a bit of work to get going reliably, plus probably a new carb, lines, tank because the fuel will be well off by now. Also those tyres have probably started to perish too. But still, Warriors are cool. I still remember mine - so much torque off the bottom end / mid range, and they make a great sound!
    1 point
  6. Hi Yamaha folks! I've been a Suzuki guy for a while, but just picked up a 2000 Blaster basket case last night. Looking for any insight or helpful advice you may have. Dude told me the top end was fine because it's "a Wiseco, not that cheap chinese sh*t", and the bottom was locked up. The top end is so "fine" that the jug slides right over the piston because the rings are stuck in their grooves. Mmmmhmm. The crank wouldn't move, but there was flash rust on a lot of the gears because the cover was left off, and after a healthy soak in PB Blaster CSP (Corrosion Stop and Prevent) I managed to get it freed up (yay!) but it will only rotate 7/8 of a full turn in either direction (boo!), and then it thuds to a stop against some as yet unidentified obstacle... I don't feel any play in the crank, webs don't appear to have any runout during the rotation I can achieve, and the rod bearing seems to have an acceptable amount of deflection. The wrist pin bearing was just shredded, and fell apart when punching out the pin. I did a little Google Fu and found a few posts around the internets about the kicker mechanism being a possible cause of the incomplete rotation issue. I suspect it's either that or one of the needles from the wrist pin bearing is lodged somewhere inconvenient. Or both. Or something entirely different and awful. Won't really know until I split the case, if I have to. I pulled the tranny drain and found a lot of filings on the magnetic plug end, so I'm soaking it in kero, gonna give it a good shake and drain it thru a coffee filter to see what comes out. I see some gouging on the case from where a chain let loose and mangled it a bit, but no cracks. And I only managed to shear off TWO bolts so far, and they're only on the Magneto cover, so no leakers I have a plethora of broken bolt and stud removers, but that's a project for AFTER determining the depths of depravity to which this poor old YFS has sunk. The (relative) pros: a decent set of FLY bars some PowerMadd handguards FMF pipe and slip on - Pipe is in excellent shape, muffler has been thoroughly defiled, and has no packing in it, but I can shape it up just fine. a DG bumper Twist throttle to save my arthritic thumb a mostly intact, mostly matching set of plastics (rear is a pretty rare dark blue vs the rest which is the more common bright blue and the nose is blue but painted black. CitriStrip and done.) Seat is in good shape, but I hate the cover, so it's getting redone. Very little monkeying done to the harness - had what I assume are dash light connectors mummified inside just shy of a mile of black tape. Cheap kill switch twist & taped to two cut wires from what was probably the OEM start/kill/lights switch. Have to look at the wiring diagram when I have a minute. Frame could use a little love in terms of paint, but appears intact and straight. Nothing a little strategic rattle canning won't solve. The cons: No rear grab bar missing/rusty/stripped hardware - I see a complete bolt set on eBay for $25, I think that's going to be necessary. no rear brakes at all - no caliper, no disc, no cable, no foot lever "Oh yeah, Blasters are notorious for missing their rear brakes" he says when I ask him about it after I've gotten home and found they are not in the box of parts. Riiiight. front tires appear to be worn out ice tires with nubs left of the studs, which sucks because I'd like to race it on the ice this winter on Lake George Obviously the motor is in pretty rough shape but I think it's workable.
    1 point
  7. Once again, because I hate finding forum threads that never delivered, the problem turned out to be a piece of the wrist pin bearing embedded in the case just as I suspected. The working theory is that the piston that was in it broke a ring as evidenced by old worn damaged spot on top of the piston, which has new rings on it. So someone reused the piston, which means they didn’t change the wrist pin bearing after a catastrophic failure of the rings, slapped it back together and probably sold it cheap to some kid who failed to properly pre-mix his oil and gas or didn’t at all. Blaster go boom. another plus, it came with a pretty sad looking FMF slip-on which cleaned up beautifully
    1 point
  8. Update: Went viral in IMGUR with this https://imgur.com/gallery/vsQXkVQ
    1 point
  9. To be fair, the boat canvas and industrial sewing machine thing started out as a similar project. I was trying to repair some outdoor gear like backpacks and stuff, and just ruining home sewing machines in the process, while failing to actually repair them. Found an old 1960s Upholstery sewing machine, in somebody’s basement for 250 bucks. Had to learn how to work on that to make it sew right. Figured it out for the most part, and started taking on side work. Grew into a full-fledged business that supports my interests, I rather enjoy it compared to every other line of work that I’ve done. My office:
    1 point
  10. Dang man all I can think is you should be a writer or editor of something because your prose looks better than that puzzle you've undertaken lol. Well at least you won't be suffering boredom for the foreseeable future. This is the first time I've laid eyes on a blaster since I was a kid ogling the atv mags so I don't have any technical input other than generic 2-stroke knowledge which isn't helping me explain what might be hung in your gears. Are you building this for you or to flip? If it were for me I wouldn't sweat the back brakes since I always take those off to save weight and complexity and they're fairly useless anyway. Did I mention I can bunnyhop my 230 with the engine off in the garage? Are there cheap chinese alternatives to wiseco? If so I might be interested. If the frame is bent they're not that hard to straighten. I have a pic of that somewhere. Well I guess I'll follow you to the yamaha board for your search for life.
    1 point
  11. Yeah lime and plum is totally me man. How'd ya know?
    1 point
  12. Some random pics while I'm thinking about it: The geometry changed since that pic. The suspension looks a little flat there. Love how the exhaust is a straight shot right out my homemade muffler. My upholstery work. It's just cloth with a plastic cover but surprisingly durable. My billet aluminum gas cap. Wiseco piston. I think the black indicates what I cut out. I don't think it amounted to much, but every little bit helps!
    1 point
  13. I actually was looking at rebuild kits when I noticed entire starters for around the same price ($25). I figured "Taiwan motor - Chinese starter is fine". There's a nice OEM Mikuni on it, but I also picked up a knockoff that came with a new petcock and airbox boot for $25 to be on the safe side. She’s a real beaut
    1 point
  14. A 5 year old would be lucky to have that quad! I don't know if you know but you can buy brushes for starters on ebay. I keep a bunch on hand. I haven't really needed them for the king but the 250ex needs a set every year or so.
    1 point
  15. 10:15pm - just under 3 hours from empty case to built. Then another 4 hours of reassembly of the quad. Wrapped up around 2 am. Got a little excited and tried to fire the starter and was greeted by a hearty “CLICK CLICK CLICK“ Swapped known good, yadda yadda. New unit on the way for Friday delivery. Picked up a replacement carbon petcock just for grins. Note to self: ALWAYS bench test the starter no matter how shiny and new it looks.
    1 point
  16. I’m not sure if it’s installed in this one, or if he just had it in the box of parts but there is a Wiseco pistons box and a little velvet baggie that came with it. And there was a nice ported and polished head along with it, and a fairly new set of Maxxis rears. So I have some more fun little parts to work with in my build. Just posted a boatload of parts on the marketplace and Craigslist, we’ll see what sort of interesting creatures that draws out 😂 Going to do some quick part swapping tomorrow once the rest of my eBay parts get here, hopefully finish up the LT80 and put the KFX80 up for sale. Flip it like a pancake. 🥞
    1 point
  17. The most amazing thing is that mouse carried all the insulation piece by piece probably from across the barn and under the noses of 10 cats. At least that's how it goes down around here. If I don't ride in a while I usually have a nest under the seat made with something way up on a shelf that would have made a better location for a nest anyway. So, did you check the tank for kerosene? Never know LOL
    1 point
  18. I get into the KFX80 last night, thinking it’ll be a quick carb clean and air filter change, put a fresh battery in it and fire it up! I swear I’ll never learn. while I was pulling the spark plug out, I noticed a little bit of pink fluff. This peaked my curiosity, and I pulled off a couple of the air induction boots to find more pink fluff. Pulled off the engine cowling… lots more pink fluff and a treasure trove of turds at the bottom. Packed all around the magneto. Cleaned that all out, found the magneto and stater and surprisingly shiny good condition, unchewed. Put the cowling all back together, and noticed that hose that goes from the cowling thru to the clutch cover. They say a mouse can fit through the hole a little bit smaller than a dime, and the idea of that hose is about the size of a quarter. I decided that out of due diligence I needed to take the clutch cover off to be sure. that turned out to be a fortuitous decision, yet a costly one in terms of time invested in the project lol IMG_1576.MOV this thing was a mouse condominium, worse than the previous one I had found, yet not nearly as badly degraded internally. Ended up taking both the clutches off and cleaning up the driven faces replacing the belt, and buttoning it all back together after a good cleaning. this is my driveway this morning
    1 point
  19. Still no word about the truck, so I was forced to acquire a dirt cheap KFX80 barn find that came with a parts pile. Guy was nice enough to even load it all off and drop it at my house, seeing as I had no truck to back up and all... Not bad from the 10-foot view Another frame, exhaust, a couple wheels, miscellaneous parts, that spare center case is cracked =( I bet someone clever could TIG it back into shape.
    1 point
  20. You might oughta see what they used for oil. Did you see any tanks of corn syrup?
    1 point
  21. this thing was a fun couple hours to figure out. Wouldn’t kick over even though it was getting spark and fuel. Turns out the fuel was red kerosene. Once I replaced that with some good old high octane gasoline, things changed remarkably for the better. Little tweaked the idle and mixture screw, and this little f*cker rips my homebrew case splitter/flywheel puller I bought the China quads after the first $200 LT80 with the broken case just to get something for him to ride a little bit while I figured out the other thing. Bought them for $100 each, sold one for $500, traded the parts one for a blaster frame and some CRF 250 plastics lol. Then last week I found the second $300 LT 80 that had a good case, but a seized crank. So now I’m on the homestretch with the LT 80, should have it running by next weekend.
    1 point
  22. Here’s hoping it all works out. I just spent the last four hours or so cleaning up the garage after working on the LT80 motor again today. Split the case again because I decided to replace the crank bearings and oil seals to be safe. Cleaned up the clutches for the belt drive, and popped the wrist pin out in anticipation of the incoming piston kit. So I did a little math, and after selling the little China quad yesterday I’m up $25 on the whole kid quad project which entailed buying two LT 80s and two China wheelers, then fixing the China wheeler, and parting out other shit. Sold a Coolster 110cc yesterday for $50 over asking price somehow ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ And I still have a boatload of spare parts to use or sell.
    1 point
  23. I guess you could put the 230 cam in the 300. 230s are notorious smokers. I figured it was due to the wrist pin wiggling in the rod end. What separates 230s from any other quad engine is the bore/stroke ratio. The stroke is so long that the rod is at a sharp angle causing the piston to press hard against the side of the bore. The 250S added a longer rod to mitigate that effect. Shorter rods increase the acceleration at TDC (which is good if you want a strong intake charge) while they decrease it at BDC. Longer rods spread the acceleration out more. The 250 also added a 17mm rod end because 16 is just not enough to hold the piston on while slinging violently from extents of that huge stroke at high rpms. Adding a heavy wiseco just makes the problem worse. The small end bore of the rod stretches into an egg shape and I'm assuming that a piston flopping around in the bore is what causes the rings to wear and the smoking. So in light of that about all you can do is make the bore as tight as possible to hold the piston straight and make the ring gaps as big as possible to be sure the rings never bind. Also keep in mind the inherent weakness when riding. You may have to learn to live with the smoking until you find a 250S engine or some other quad. There are too many things wrong with the 230S to make them worth building. The 300 on the other hand is a good candidate. Honestly I'd probably beat the snot out of the 230 until I saved up enough to find something better to invest in.
    1 point
  24. I guess webcams is the way to go but you have to send in your cam and rockers for welding which is hard enough to shred anything that isn't just as hard. Plus webcams will grind any profile you want. A lot of guys ran webcams stage 2 back in the day. Instead of doing all that it's just easier to get a 250S cam which I already know boosts power without sacrificing lowend and it preserves the longevity of OEM. A stage 2 webcam might be a bit more power but when dealing with 1/4 liter engines it wouldn't be so much that rider skill couldn't makeup for. A guy I know had a 660 raptor and I ran off n left him all the time on trails with an essentially stock 250S on a modded frame. I was actually trying to blow the engine so I had excuse to rebuild it, but never could. The 660 is too heavy and too much power to negotiate curves. Keeping the front tires on the ground so it could steer was the biggest challenge. If I had a 660 the first thing I'd do is put bald tires on it, but he had holeshots that were way too aggressive. Too many people buy into looks and names instead of what works (the jeet kune do of quading lol).
    1 point
  25. There was a "vault" on atvconnection that had everything in it. https://atvconnection.com/forums/suzuki/226867-85-88-suzuki-lt230s-quadsport-help-2.html Looks like it may be gone https://atvconnection.com/forums/suzuki/226867-85-88-suzuki-lt230s-quadsport-help-1269.html#post3447760 I guess it was hosted by a guy who got tired of paying for it.
    1 point
  26. The LTZ cam is the same as the KQ 300 and the 250 4x4 “D” on the end
    1 point
  27. I've moved away from Cat because of stuff like that. Finding 20yo parts is hard enough, but paying premium prices for them is worse. Had a headgasket go on my 01 ZR800.... 2 o-rings.... over $50. For 2 o-rings. Then parts like fuel pumps aren't available in OEM or aftermarket new, used ones selling for more than new did with no guarantee of condition... yeah....Textron/Cat killed Cats for me. Sent from my SM-G991U using Tapatalk
    1 point
  28. I had an 02 that wouldn't open all the way. I was shocked (and p!ssed) at how much that tiny thermostat was.....3x more than the OEM was in my Ford Diesel..... but it fixed the problem for me. If you don't know how old the coolant is probably a good time to change it out if you don't have a test kit. Sent from my SM-G991U using Tapatalk
    1 point
  29. Had the privilege to get out both days this weekend, weather was fantastic. Was able to take my oldest brother out to an area he hadn't been to yet, and was thankful that we got to spend that time together just the two of us. I did ask some others to go but they were unable to make it so it ended up making a special day for us. His health is not the greatest so will definitely treasure the time and memories of this outing. Was also able to finally link up with my neighbor and some friends of theirs and take them on one of our favorite trails today. They seem to be gone most weekends over the summer so has been tough to connect over the past 4 years since they bought their Razors. They seem to stick pretty close and go riding and camping together most weekends. With fall setting in and it dipping into the high 20's and low low 30's at night, our camping season is coming to a close. Still in the 50's - 70's during the day but pretty chilly at night. They had a free weekend so we were finally able to take advantage and get out. Today confirmed for me, once again, why we haven't moved to the sidexside realm yet. We were going to ride on one trail, and even though they have 50" machines. The trailheads have huge rocks, posts, or arched cattle guard type gated areas that are exactly 50" apart. This keeps the larger sized SxS's, jeeps and other 4 wheel drive vehicles off the trails and from getting torn to shreds. My wife and I drove our ATV'S through and friends attempted to do the same. Even though the posts were 50" apart and perfectly plumb, the ground was sloped side to side causing the fenders and door area to lean too far to the side and would have scratched the entire side of the machine as he drove through. He couldn't even get the front fender flair through with out it getting scraped and gouged by the wire of the fence wrapped around the posts. So had to change plans and go different route. Still ended up being a terrific day and they had a great time riding in a new area. No SxS for us in the near future!!! Here's some pics from both days
    1 point
  30. When your quad sits a lot , especially the new electronic ignition, computer controlled ones they should be kept on a battery maintainer. The small trickle used by the electronics even when the ignition is off will drain the battery. SLA and AGM batteries also always have a bit of self discharge so the combination of the electronics and self discharge means they must be kept up topped up. They do not like to be deep discharged and quickly lose capacity if they are .. Totally flatten either type and you are pretty much guaranteed the battery is toast.. A small maintainer is a lot cheaper than a battery and will eliminate the buying of a new battery every year. I have one on my truck, another on my quad and a third on my riding lawnmower.
    1 point
  31. Your welcome and I hope it helps people out
    1 point
  32. I just uploaded the factory service manual for the 2019 sportsman 850/1000. It just needs to be approved by admin
    1 point
  33. I was thinking that I wouldn't blame those guys too much because I can't remember how many intake valves I've installed without cutting the seat, but I always attributed the wearing to bad air filtration. Finally after making the same mistake over and over it dawned on me that there is no way to replace a valve without cutting the seat. No one told me that in all my reading. I mean, I might have seen it suggested, but not emphatically necessitated. Any wearing at all on the seat is not going to mesh with the new valve and all that's needed is to wear the hardness off the valve and it's gone. It's imperative to have the valve and seat at exactly the same angle. It's also important to have the contact patch in the center of the valve footprint. In light of that, I bought my own cutter. So far I've used it once, so it hasn't paid for itself yet lol. But after using it I discovered that I'd likely not trust anyone else to do the job. They could cut corners and most people wouldn't know.
    1 point
  34. The service manual usually has routing diagrams for the hoses, cables, and wiring - I think there's a sticky link to it. On the topic of your crank>fire>die issue, check the Neutral safety switch. Look for a single blue wire running into the loom right near the carb. Usually has a bullet connector. pull that bullet apart and run a jumper wire with a bullet on one end and a ring terminal on the other to the frame to ground it and try starting the bike. It's a common issue from what I gather, look for the "Start in gear mod" for more detailed directions if you need them. It's worked for me on 2 separate quads now, worth a shot.
    1 point
  35. That rustoleum is good stuff. I shoulda done that. A buddy painted his truck bed cap with rustoleum bed liner and I must say it looks pretty good. I did some experimenting with cams back in the day and the 250S is the way to go regardless what the application. 250S cam will spin the tires in donuts in higher gears than any other stock cam (implying more torque, not less). I forgot the specifics, but it's a vast departure in terms of duration than the 230s, LT4WD, and 300 which are all pretty close to each other. The 250S was Suzuki's answer to the Honda 250X. They added decent shocks, a 7th clutch plate, 17mm piston wrist pin. +1mm intake valve, nice straight exhaust from the head, and just about anything you could think to do to the 230 aside from high comp piston. The cam was no exception. If you really want to get carried away, the first year of the LT4WD had ovate springs which are stiffer than both springs together in the 300. I don't know why they did it since stiffer springs are really only needed for rpms, which the LT4WD was not. But I've had my 300 well over 11k rpms so it's perfectly capable if the valves can be closed fast enough. I thought briefly about returning to the original springs when I re-rebuilt the engine in 2019, but decided that they survived 7 years and didn't hurt anything so I may as well keep them. If you really want to go hog wild, KZ1000 pistons will fit. Then the problem will be finding studs strong enough to hold the head on. That's where I stopped with my 250S build. ARP didn't call me back and I lost interest. Actually, the 69.5 piston (10.5 CR) I have in my 300 now will lift the head sometimes when lugging. I can hear the gasket squeak. Looking good man! And I like your hilarious narration of the progression. Looking forward to more posts!
    1 point
  36. Already have a fan on the way, and some replacement valve inspection caps to try and stem the tide of oil leaking right onto the exhaust. It’s like a friggin James Bond 007 car with the smokescreen button 😂 Might just pick up a couple of the 250s cams and throw the other one in my Frankenquad (160 with a 230e motor swapped in, and a DG RCM neighbor annoyer) to spice things up Threw a coat of paint on the plastics after a lot of media blasting and priming and sanding. JD Yellow from TSC Racing is a damn near dead ringer for the Suzuki yellow.
    1 point
  37. Watching the scuffle in slow motion i saw that neither fighter had their fists closed. All were slaps. That tells me it was either planned or they really have control of themselves. Cuz in a situation like that your normal instinct is to clinch fists.
    1 point
  38. Yep, I agree and also on the point that its a Honda, so no worries!
    1 point
  39. Yeah, that sounds pretty typical. Once it's broken in and gets the oil changed things should work just fine - hey, it's a Honda, no worries bud!
    1 point
  40. Here is the wiring diagram for that machine. It'll help you trace out the fault. You say there is continuity on the start button , but is there power to it when in neutral and ignition on ? If not , trace back from there, if there is then check switch to relay and beyond until you find the break. Honda TRX 200 service manual 1984 - B. 1984 TRX200(1).pdf
    1 point
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  44. I uploaded the Yamaha service manual for your Big Bear. Covers 2000 & 2001. First time I've done this so I hope it downloads correctly.
    1 point
  45. The best way to check for bad valves is to find TDC at compression stroke and then wiggle the rocker arm. If there is play, the valve is good. If not, a new seat must be cut and new valve installed. I've tried dozens of times to install a new valve in an old seat, but 100% of the time I've had to continually replace that valve. It seems there is no way around cutting a new seat.
    1 point
  46. Good points! Concerning carbs, I keep some guitar wire around for cleaning jets and small holes. Chemicals don't do much. Regulators are common problems on these machines and if it runs better with the lights on, that's the problem. I bought the biggest baddest regulator Rick's Electronics sells because I fried 2 OEM ones. Rev limiters can sometimes be improved by using an older CDI, but the problem with rpms is the weak valve springs. One of the first models of these machines (250 model) had ovate springs which are super-stiff. Zuki only used them one year and I forgot which year since that was 5 years ago for me. If there are changes in the spark due to heat, then it means a coil somewhere has lost enamel due to age. That is common on the 80's models 230 quadsports that start fine when cold but are impossible when hot. Alternatively, cold starting problems could mean worn intake valve.
    1 point
  47. heres a little trick I figured out for hard starting atvs that seem to run but shut down and sputter out. If your having Backfiring through the carb, spitting gas out through the carb it maybe a bad intake valve not seating properly. To test this Pull spark plug out, move piston to TDC on compression stroke, Take some compressed air with a air nozzle in spark plug hole, make sure you can seal it to the hole so no air can escape. apply the air and listen for air escaping through the carb or the exhaust valves. that will determine if you have a bad valve. Best way to check for bad valves.
    1 point
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OEM Parts at Aftermarket Prices



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