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xe004ADNOH

2005 Honda 400ex - Rear Alignment

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i have a 2005 honda 400ex that started pulling to the left. tie rods, air pressure are all good. but i noticed my rear axel is tweak a little. i measured the distance between the front and rear wheels at the center of the axles on both side. the distance betwen the right side is shorter from what i mesured on the left side of the quad. witch is what i think is causing it to pull to the left. does anyone know how i go about aligning the rear axle?

thanks

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On a 400ex it might mean your rear carrier bearings are shot. Lift the rear off the ground and wiggle / spin the axle. Any sort of play or noise means you might need new bearings. Also check to make sure the axle lock nut is tight. Its in between the brake rotor and axle carrier

Sent from my SGH-T989 using Xparent BlueTapatalk 2

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