Quantcast
Jump to content

  • Do you own an ATV or UTV? Join our Forum!

    Join QUADCRAZY ATV Forum today for FREE! We keep these forums clean and user friendly. All first posters will have to wait to have their content reviewed and approved. Once your first post is approved, you will no longer need to got through an approval process. To gain immediate approval and a NO ADS experience, consider subsribing to our Premium Membership.

Suzuki lt 80 top end seized after rebuild


Michaeld
 Share

Recommended Posts

Dream Car Giveaway

Since it is  a  2  stroke  it requires an  oil /gas  mix .  My  guess is  either  the  oil  injection  pump has  quit  working  or  it  was  out of oil .  A  lot  of  LT 80  owners just  premix  the   gas and  oil  and  forget the  injector.  Here  are instructions  stolen from another forum  on  completely removing the   injector  pump.  Most   owners recommend  a  32/1 oil mix although some  say  a   40   or  50/1 mix  works for them .  I'd  go  with the  32/1.

DefaultLT 80 Oil injection/premix

If you want to DC it, I would just pull everything off and keep it in the event you ever want to put it back on.
Chances are you won't, but it would only take a minute to put it all back on if needed.
To disconnect, pull the cover on the left side where you access the clutches. (not the small round one, but the whole side cover)..
There will be a plastic piece on the front clutch that turns the oil pump, just pull that off.
If you just want to DC it and leave everything intact, that should be all you need to do.
You probably could plug the hose coming from the resevoir and then hook it back up, but not sure if that's necessary to prevent some minor draining into the carb.

To completely take it all off...........
Disconnect the hose coming from the oil resevoir. If you want to keep it attached, plug the end and roll it up and wire tie it out of sight.
If you want to remove the pump itself, you can fabricate a cover that will bolt right on. Use the bottom of the pump as a template. Or you can order a block off kit I believe.
Pull the tube from the carburetor and plug that hole.
 
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The  only way  I  can  think  of  would be to  disconnect  the  line  from the oil  injector  pump at the  carb and  temporarily  plug  the  fitting so  you wouldn't  have  a vacuum leak. .  Fill  the   gas tank with 32/1 mix  and run  the  engine ..  See  if  oil  comes  out  of the  line  from  the  pump to the  carb.  I suspect t  is   exactly  because of an  unreliability of  that oil  pump  that  so  many  eliminate it  and  go  for  premix.       Your  piston  displays   the classic scuff marks  of    an  oil starved  2  stroke.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Similar Topics

    • By Oger69420
      Just like the title says how do I find out what I have here I was told that it is a 1985 200 That is all I know and I need to Start looking for parts

    • By Jaskafin
      When i put power on it takes couple seconds and difflock light starts to burn but His is 2wd. I opened the front servomotor unit but no help. Fuses are ok, Relays are ok. Power is on limpmode when the difflight burns.. Whatta hell is problem. Will it help if i brake the light from the dash...
    • By Frank Angerano
      I’ve decided to post  a thread on the process of cleaning a carburetor and what’s needed in order to do it properly.    There are some members that are new to this and are not very versed in doing so. I want to help and feel this might explain things better. I would hope this helps you along.     We all have our own little tricks of the trade so I’m sharing my process on how i break a carburetor down, clean, reassemble and adjust it to peak performance. I welcome any other members input on this topic.     List of things I use:   Safety glasses !!!   Rags.   I like to use old white Tee shirts or I buy and always have a few white pillow cases from the dollar store on hand. The cheap ones.     I like to use a frisbee turned      upside down like a bowl to keep the liquids to a minimum on spillage to the work bench.    A set of cleaning picks and brushes or a piece of bicycle break cable, I separate the strands and use them to clean out the tiny holes in the jets. (Pic attached)     A can of gum out  carburetor cleaner with the small red tube that attaches to the spray tip.  (Pic attached)   A can of compressed air, the kind used to clean out keyboards on computers. It also has the small red tube that attaches to the spray tip.  Or a compressor if you have one with a blow out tip.  (Pic attached)   A piece of clean hose that I can connect to the fuel line port on the carburetor to test the float operation. About 10 inches long.    A few Q tips.   The process: I like to put the pillow case down on the work bench and spread it out flat.   This really helps in being able to keep track of parts. Especially because it’s white.     I use the frisbee because it’s small enough to keep parts contained and durable enough to deal with the chemicals and any gas that will come out of the carburetor while opening it up.     It’s important to make sure you keep track of where everything came off and where the screws and parts all go back.     I like to start at the bottom and pull the bowl off. I immediately spray the inside of the bowl down with carb cleaner until its about half way full and set it aside.   Then I take the float out and check it for any fluid inside. If it’s a white color float you can hold a flashlight under it and see through it for any fluid inside.  If it black just shake it up and listen for fluid inside. No fluid inside is a good thing !    When the float comes out the fill valve needle will come with it. I take that needle and put it in the carburetor bowl that I filled with carburetor cleaner. This way it soaks for a bit. I do the same thing with the jets also once they are unscrewed and out toss them into the bowl to soak.    Take the air/fuel mixture screw out and soak that as well.  Side note: the air/fuel screw should have a screw, spring, washer and o ring.    After all the jets and parts are out and soaking I like to take the carburetor cleaner, use the small red tube and stick it in all the little holes/ports on the carburetor and spray.   I do this while it’s in the frisbee. This way there is no mess. I look to see where the spray pressure comes out on the other side of that port.   Once this is all done I start running my brushes and cleaning tips gently through all of the holes/ports and spraying it again with the carb cleaner.  After I feel I’ve seen a clear flow of fluid through all the openings I spray them with the can of air the exact way I did with the carburetor cleaner. This will blow out any left over junk that’s still in the carburetor.   Check the choke operation is working properly and spray it clean. Most choke devices are easily cleaned up so hit it and move on since they are mechanical and it’s just a matter of freeing them up, spraying with cleaner and lube.   There are multiple types of chokes but many of them for the most part are mechanically operated.    Once this is completed I wipe the entire carburetor down good and blow it clean and set aside.     I then start working on the jets one by one. Start by running the cleaning tips and brushes through all the tiny holes making sure they are all clean. Hit it with the carburetor cleaner and then air. I hold a flashlight to it when it’s done so I can make sure all of the holes are clear. I set all the jets aside on the work area.  Do the same thing for the float needle and air/fuel screw.    Now once this is all complete you can set the frisbee aside and start to reassemble the carburetor on the clean white surface.   I start by running a Q tip in where the fill needle sits into the carburetor. Some carbs have a small o ring that needs to be clean for proper seating of the fill needle.     Carefully reinstall the jets where they came from and do not strip or over tighten the jets and use the proper size screwdrivers when removing and reinstalling the jets.    Reinstall the air/fuel mixture screw and set it to what’s called out in the manual for that bike.    Install the float and fill needle assembly.    Now in order to test that float I like to take that piece of hose I mentioned and connect it to where the fuel line gets connected to the carburetor. I then turn the carburetor over to the upright position and blow into the hose. You should hear air coming out of the bottom of the carburetor. While blowing, lift the float up and the air should stop.  Let it go and the float should fall down opening the fill valve and you should hear air again.  The air should stop about 3/4 way up when raising that float while your blowing air into it.   If so then your good to go. If not make an adjustment    Set the carburetor down, take the bowl and empty it.   Clean it out and scrape/wipe any old junk inside and blow it out good.   There is a screw on the outside of the bottom of the bowl. Remove it and clean it out and reinstall.     Turn the carburetor over and reinstall the bowl. Tighten the screws in a crisscross pattern so the bowl seats evenly.     I like to put the hose on one more time and do a float test to make sure it’s opening and closing properly. All you have to do is blow into the hose and run the carburetor  upside down to see if the air stops.     Reinstall the carb and you should be good to go!    All pics of the items I use are attached below.   If you understand this great. If not ask away! Don’t be shy and don’t cut corners.   You will only wind up pulling the carburetor off of the bike for the third and forth time before you get it right.    The last thing to be discussed is dialing in the air/fuel screw when your finally put back together and running.  This is a relatively easy task.   Again I hope this helps!    Frank.     


    • By deke
      The bearings went bad but I don't know how to remove the rear axle to replace them.  Any advice would be appreciated.


    • Dream Car Giveaway
    • By rebeltaz
      I've got an 03 Prairie 360 4x4 that needs a left front ball joint and knuckle assembly. On the diagram (from PartShark - https://www.partshark.com/oemparts/a/kaw/50a852a0f870021a9c423c20/suspension ) they show the ball joint as a part of the knuckle assembly, extending down into the lower a-arm and held on with a nut. On the four wheeler I have, the ball joint is pressed into the lower a-arm and extends upwards into the knuckle assembly and is held in place with a bolt going horizontally, clamping the ball joint in place.

      Any idea on why the diagram is different and how I can find the actual parts I need?
  • Gallery Images

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...