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xtreamclean

X-Tream Clean New Product Release - Chain Lube Gel Spray (CLG)

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X-Tream Clean Products based in Charlotte, NC has introduced a new product called Chain Lube Gel Spray (CLG) to its line-up of quality cleaning solutions designed for the powersports industry. X-Tream Clean Chain Lube Gel Spray is unlike many of the chain lube products on the market today. We have combined the attributes of lubrication with lock-on technology into one product that will provide superior lubrication without sling. Chain Lube Gel Spray is a gel bodied product that goes on wet to penetrate all chain surfaces and quickly dries to a clear film. Our high performance PTFE gel lube will penetrate hard to reach areas and then expand to provide long lasting lubrication and rust prevention. Chain Lube Gel Spray remains pliable, will not harden or crack and will resist change due to mechanical working.

Tired of thick, messy, waxy, dirt and dust attracting chain lubes? Chain Lube Gel Spray is designed to dry to a non-tacky film helping to prevent dirt and dust from building up on your chain while still providing X-Tream lubrication. Product is also easily cleaned when you’re done riding unlike many waxy chain lubes that are a hassle to wash off. Cleaning our non-tacky, non-messy, non-waxy chain lube is X-Treamly easy. Chain Lube Gel Spray repels water and is an excellent rust and corrosion inhibitor. Chain Lube Gel Spray does not contain any CFC’s and is non-corrosive. Safe for all standard and o-ring type chains. California OTC VOC Compliant. Product is packaged in a 13 oz aerosol and retails for $9.95. More info www.mxwash.com.

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