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Fbernard

2005 Suzuki Twin Peaks

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Hi:

i have a 2005 Suzuki Twin Peaks. I have to do some top end work and have a question. I did buy a service manual and somehow the manual says to remove the camshaft chain tensioner for the rear cylinder and there is only one on the front cylinder. 

I will work on the front cylinder, no issue there but I don't know what to do about the rear cylinder. No compression on the front cylinder. I think the KACR may be the culprit but I have to investigate. I have a broken exhaust stud on the rear cylinder and I have exhausted every method to remove it without success so I have to pull the head. 

Any guidance would be appreciated. 

Francois

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Wow ok. I snapped mine on my Honda flush.  I drilled the center out very carefully and used an easy out to spin it out. Also I sprayed it with penetrating oil 24 hours ahead of that. The trick I used to start my drilling was a small punch tool to indent the center of the stud and a very good drill bit going slow as to not break the bit.  Easy outs are a great device for this. But room for drilling may be tight there. 

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Try to get the drill as exactly on center  as you can. If you  can  get  hold of a reverse twist  drill  bit  use  it.  If the stud comes loose while drilling  a reverse twist  bit  would  back it  out on its own  rather than  running it  in deeper..  I  have a set of  screw  extractors wit  a  reverse twist drill  bit on one end  and   a conical extractor on the  other .  If you  can find a set of them , they  are ideal  for that job.

 

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Thanks for the replies. There is no room to drill even with an angle drill and that is why I have to remove the rear head. My question is really about the removal of the camshaft tensioner on the rear head which is not there!

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Well if your able to tear into that bike then posting some pics here should be a walk on the park.  I’m curious to see how this goes. I will look into that bike in the meantime and see if I can find anything that might help.  Good luck 

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On th first picture you can see the camshaft chain tensioner on the front cylinder. Second and third picture are kind of the same showing the rear cylinder. You can see the boss where the camshaft chain tensioner should be but it is not bored or drilled. The fourth picture is a top view showing both cylinders. It is kind of hard to see unless you enlarge the pictures. 

Thanks for looking into it for me. 

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Well come to find out the front head was warped roughly 005". I picked up a quart counter top sample 12"X12", clamped 120 grit sand paper and sanded the imperfections. Finished with 400 grit. Installed and torqued. Runs with no leaks. Still needs work since I bought this thing from Letgo but making progress. 

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Oh, I forgot to mention that both intake valves were bent due to improper timing which was the cause of no compression on the front cylinder.  The seller failed to mention that. He said it ran fine last year but it has been stored ever since. He said I think the carbs are gummed up. Not all people are created equal. I should have known better because that thing was rough. I paid 1/3 of the asking price and still OK dollar wise as long as I don't figure my labor. Parts were missing everywhere not to mention several broken bolts. Almost all back together now. 

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11 minutes ago, Fbernard said:

Well come to find out the front head was warped roughly 005". I picked up a quart counter top sample 12"X12", clamped 120 grit sand paper and sanded the imperfections. Finished with 400 grit. Installed and torqued. Runs with no leaks. Still needs work since I bought this thing from Letgo but making progress. 

That would be quartz not quart. 

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Well I had popping and bogging down issues upon start up. Installed new spark plugs, no change. I cleaned all the carbs but couldn't find any blockage.  I did a preliminary synchronization of the carbs using one of the carb cleaning tool. I noticed then that the rear carb engagement had a delay.  A lot of parts were missing when I bought this quad. I realized that a spring goes between the two levers. Now it runs great. 

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