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aaron cesene

I need help here!! 2008 Arctic Cat 366 Blown Motor

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I have a 08 artic cat 366 4x4 fis red.   Blown motor.  Anyone know or where to find out what engines are compatible with this bike?  Would love to upgrade if possible.  My other option is to rebuild.  It broke good might have pieces in jug!!  So might have to come all the way apart.   Help please

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I would check with arcticcat parts house and use their live chat or try country cat. They may be able to tell you what's compatible/upgrade. It'll be cheaper to rebuild it.

Here's the part # on the engine assembly:

 

image.thumb.png.d411cd3c5265594374b3e57ee0b23548.png

 

 

image.thumb.png.608db543353c0bf5f5187d0e998c090f.png

 

Also check: https://www.powersportsnation.com/arctic-cat-366-a-fis-4x4-08-engine-motor-core-crankshaft-17828.html

image.thumb.png.a281306fd515fd55702567d228be3ff9.png

 

 

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Doorfx on Arcticchat.com replied to your same post and listed all the years that is the same.

It is usually cheaper to rebuild then replace, also keep in mind its a Kymco engine so parts can be sourced from Kymco.

Mike

 

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