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Tiffany Rowland

Resistor vs Non Resistor Plugs/caps

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From what I've read, the only function of a resistor is to prevent radio frequencies from interfering with automotives with onboard computer systems. If the only function of a resistor is to prevent damage to a vehicle's computer system, then why would they not be standard for every vehicle equipped with a computer? Are there downsides to using them? 

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I think you are referring to a ferrite bead choke

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferrite_bead

 

A resistor does nothing to block EMI interference, it is designed to resist the flow of current. They are commonly used for LED lights to limit the current to the LED to prevent the LED from drawing too much current and burning out prematurely.

The use of EMI filters or chokes depends on the application. Some circuits or cables are very sensitive to interference. An example would be in automation systems (production machine) that uses PLC controls, the communication between the modules is low voltage and high frequency, so it would require these filters to prevent false signals.

In a vehicle, the process of generating the high voltage needed to fire the spark plugs would produce frequency interference so some components in the vehicle would be shielded to prevent signal interference as an example.

Mike

 

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I  don't know  of any  downside to  using resistor  plugs .  They're not necessary on  older  non-electronic ignition  machines,  and  non-resistor plugs  are unlikely to  cause  problems on newer  ones. In my opinion it's always best to  go with the  plug types and  heat range recommended  by the  machines manufacturer.

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