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StolenATV

STOLEN ATV: Yamaha Big Bear 400

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A red atv with low mileage (approx. 600-700)…Front plastic recently replaced so its shinier than the rear.

Front steel tube bumper/brush guard was bent from a previous collision, shop bent it back into place but its still just a little off.

Front tires are brand new. (picture shown was before the new front tires)

Has a Deceptacon (Transformers) decal/tag on the front plastic cover of speedometer.

The post Yamaha Big Bear 400 appeared first on Stolen 911.

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