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1998 Blaster for my son


Sc0tt

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i wuld suggest a hydrolic rear disk conversion. very good compared to the brakes on the blaster. i would look into rebuilding the carbourator(i found a kit for $15) also buy spark plugs, if you even attepmt going at an incline you will screw up your plug, trust me. 3 months of constant tearing apart isnt worth $3

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i wuld suggest a hydrolic rear disk conversion. very good compared to the brakes on the blaster. i would look into rebuilding the carbourator(i found a kit for $15) also buy spark plugs, if you even attepmt going at an incline you will screw up your plug, trust me. 3 months of constant tearing apart isnt worth $3

You were fowling plugs, You can't drop a 2 stroke into low RPMs to lug it up a hill. You have to make that thing SCREAM!:aargh:

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Well we got it. I can't believe I bought it with out starting it but it seems that the carb problems are worst than I thought. We are getting any gas through the carb it appears. I think the compression is a little low too. I will have to get a compression tester on it. It has a full Graydon Proline exhaust on it. It has been bored but we don't know how much. Tires are in good shape and it has a new set of bars on it. I did manage to get it for $350 dollars though. I am going to take the carb off tomorrow and see what I can find out.

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  • 2 weeks later...
My son is 14 and no he is graduating from a Polaris Predator 90. I am picking some stuff up. I need to sell his to get the money to do the majority of the work but I will be pulling it down this weekend to see what the inside of the cylinder looks like.

Good luck with that. Take some pictures and post them up...:biggrin:

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