Quantcast
Jump to content

  • Do you own an ATV? Join our Forum!

    As a member, you can post in our forums, upload your photos and videos, use and contribute to our downloads, create your own member page, add your ATV events, and even start your own ATV club to host your own club forum and gallery.  Registration is fast and you can even login with social network accounts to sync your profiles and content.

Recommended Posts

Hi all - new here.

Just getting into ATVs, & can't find enough info to make an informed decision. I want a 500, 4X4, auto, shaft drive, IFS, 4 wheel disc brakes, & the AC seems to be my best bet. Does the AC use belts within its case?

I guess I'm looking for firsthand experience w/ the AC ATVs - no "I know this guy that knew this guy that had problems" internet forum stuff. I'm very mech inclined, so am confident I can fix anything that might break. I'll add a winch & little else.

I'll mostly use it for trail riding, to follow my little wild man around on his ATV, but would like one I won't have to worry about abusing if the opportunity presents itself. There's a club not too far from my house & I know most of the guys there. Some have "heard" that the ACs aren't worth my time, but I'd rather hear someone's personal experience over second hand info.

Thanks in advance for the help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


I have a 2006 250 Arctic Cat 2wd, and I haven't found anything it couldn't do for me when I tried! I don't know much about it technically, but I can handle Sand dunes and desert terrain equally well. I mostly ride with little kids though, (mine) so I haven't pushed it real hard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Arctic Cats are the way to go i own a 2003 400 4x4. What a machine there isn't anything i would change on it. But if u are just going to ride on the trails that would be fine with stock tires, but if u are gunna take it through some mud pits i suggest getting different tires. They are built very well and the ground clearance is amazing compared to everything else. Great work horses as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The main thing I would be worried about is if there is anyone in your area that will work on em. The only place that sells them in my area is Bass Pro Shop but they don't work on em.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have no personal exp. with them but everything I have heard is great. I do know that they are a very solid machine, and they are towards the top of the food chain in 4x4 racing. If there is a Gander Mountain anywhere they sell and service them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Hi all - new here.

Just getting into ATVs, & can't find enough info to make an informed decision. I want a 500, 4X4, auto, shaft drive, IFS, 4 wheel disc brakes, & the AC seems to be my best bet. Does the AC use belts within its case?

I guess I'm looking for firsthand experience w/ the AC ATVs - no "I know this guy that knew this guy that had problems" internet forum stuff. I'm very mech inclined, so am confident I can fix anything that might break. I'll add a winch & little else.

I'll mostly use it for trail riding, to follow my little wild man around on his ATV, but would like one I won't have to worry about abusing if the opportunity presents itself. There's a club not too far from my house & I know most of the guys there. Some have "heard" that the ACs aren't worth my time, but I'd rather hear someone's personal experience over second hand info.

Thanks in advance for the help.

The one thing that stands out about Artic Cats is the suspension. They definately have a beefed up set up. I've ridden a 500 CC and found it to be very stiff. I like comfort and this is why I went with a King Quad. The Arctic Cat is also easier to rollover from what I have seen, sits high.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Topics

    • By PolarisRich
      I thought I would make a quick "How-to" on setting wheel alignment since I was flipping my tie rod ends and I was going to have to re-align the wheels anyways.
      Here's some of the tools you will need...

      1.) Start with the ATV on a smooth and level surface, like a cement garage floor or driveway.

      2.)Center up (Eyeball It) the handle bars and lock them into place with 2 ratchet straps, one on each side of handle bars. This of course prevents them from moving when your adjusting the tie-rods.

      3.) Place two Jack Stands approximately 2 feet in front of the atv even with the outside edge of the two front wheels.

      4.) Wrap a length of string all the way around the ATV and Jack Stands, Start and end at the rear hitch. Make sure the string is the same height from the ground on all 4 wheels. I like to attach a few elastic bands to both ends of the string before attaching the string to the hitch. This makes it easier to adjust the strings when moving the Jack Stands.

      4.) Break lose the inner and outer tie-rod nuts. NOTE! Make sure you use 2 wrenches, one on the nut and one on the ball joint. Damage can occur by only using one wrench.

      5.) Adjust the string by moving the Jack Stands in or out untill the string just touches both of the side surfaces of the rear tires on each side of the ATV. This will take some time to get it right but it needs to be done!

      Check manufacturers wheel alignment specifications on your specific make and model before you adjust any components.
      For this wheel alignment I'm using the Polaris Specs which seems to be a common setting.
      Polaris - The recommended toe alignment is 1/8″ to 1/4″ toe out. This is a total amount, not per wheel.
      6.) On the front rim, measure the distance from the string to the rim at the front and rear edges of the rim. The rear measurement should be 1/16″ - 1/8″ (.2 to .3 cm) more than the front measurement.


      7.) If an adjustment is necessary, Turn the tie rod itself with a wrench or your hand in small increments. It doesn't take much to move the tire a long way, so go slow. Keep re-checking your measurement's until you have a 1/16″ - 1/8″ differance to the string.

      6.) Once your satisfied that you have the correct "Toe Out" measurements you can tighten up the inner and outter tie-rod nuts on both sides. AGAIN...make sure to use 2 wrenches.
      7.) Now take your ATV for a test drive to test your adjustments. If it still pulls one way or the other, just repeat the above steps to tweek the adjustments again utill your happy.
      The whole process only takes about 15-20 min.
    • By quadcrazy
      We are starting this topic so that members can share their view about ATVs; what they are used for, types, etc. This topic is intended to help new members and visitors and generally those that don't know much about ATVs and would like to learn. So anything you can add to this topic that you feel would benefit a new comer, please add a reply..
    • By dctaz37
      Hello, the ATV doesn't stop anymore so I guess it is time to replace the brakes. Looking for part number and instructions. I think it may have shoes front + back and the front would be hydraulic. 
    • By Rich1028
      Gladwin Trails Not What you Expect to Find on A Quad Trail
       
    • By Ajmboy
      Saw this in the news...was this anyone here?????  🤔
      13 ATVs and dirt bikes impounded from N.J. wildlife area. Riders face list of charges.
      State officials charged several people with various violations and impounded their ATVs and dirt bikes last weekend from the Greenwood Forest Wildlife Management Area in Ocean County, authorities said.
      Police officers with the state’s Fish and Wildlife Conservation were investigating illegal off-road vehicle use in the management area on Saturday, July 25 when two ATV riders tried to flee, officials said.
      When officers caught up with them, they issued summonses for criminal obstruction, interference with the duties of a conservation police officer, and violations of wildlife management area use. The two ATVs were impounded, police said.
      The next day, a group of ATV and dirt bike riders from northern New Jersey drove past several “NO ATV” signs posted in the wildlife area known as “clay holes.”
      Clay holes, or “blue holes” are former gravel or sand mines filled with water. They are popular, although dangerous, destinations for teenagers and adults looking to beat the summer heat.
      Officers issued summonses to the riders for illegally operating off-road vehicles and for driving unregistered vehicles. They also wrote tickets for illegal swimming, possession of alcohol and entering a restricted area.
      In all, 13 ATVs and dirt bikes were impounded. The owners are facing fines starting at $274, and impound, towing and storage fees of at least $300, conservation police said.
      In a statement, police said “only registered, insured, street-legal vehicles are permitted in Wildlife Management Areas. Vehicles may only be operated on established roads and parking areas.”

      This is from: https://www.nj.com/ocean/2020/08/13-atvs-and-dirt-bikes-impounded-from-nj-wildlife-area-riders-face-list-of-charges.html 
  • Similar Tagged Content

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...