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Desert-Hawk

So Long Old friend

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In the last five years I've had the pleasure to ride what

I believe is one of the finest ATV's My '05 'Desert Edition'

Honda Rubicon. From the desert flats in 100° heat to elevations

of 10,000ft, in temps of 19° Through boulder infested dried up

river beds and wash's and a occasional run in fender deep snow

not once did I have to walk or be towed back to camp !

This has allowed me to rack up 9,200 issue free miles and the

opportunity to ride and meet with some fantastic people across

the state of Arizona and points beyond...it's been a most excellent

adventure to say the least.

At this point in my life I have come to the reality that I'm not as

young as I once was and the need for an IRS suspension was becoming

more attractive after a long day of exploring in the desert southwest.

So I'd like to present My 2009 "Desert Hawk" Edition Rincon

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My goal for this unit was to have all of the thing's that made the Ruby

the ultimate (for me) ATV with just a bit more snort and a cushy ride.

With this idea and information I've read on all of the site's I visit

I do believe my goal has been accomplished !

Nothing like this can be achieved with out some help so I'd like to

give a shout out to the Staff of Coyote Honda in Avondale, AZ.

ARIZONA'S LEVEL 5 Honda Powerhouse Dealer.

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Left to Right Parts Manager Matt Service Manager John, And Master Technician

Dave who kept the Ruby in top running condition since 2005.

This will be the last time I'll ever see this on the Rincon !

005.jpg

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Thanks BuckBilly :wink:

Ajmboy, Not yet and with a few things coming up this weekend

it's looking like next week :aargh:

A buddy of mine has two '08's and I've racked up a few miles on his

the thing I'll really be watching is the off camber areas.

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Glad to see you stopped in to QuadCrazy to visit us!! I see on the Honda Foreman Forum all the time. Thanks for sharing your Rinny with us.

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Thanks BuckBilly :wink:

Ajmboy, Not yet and with a few things coming up this weekend

it's looking like next week :aargh:

A buddy of mine has two '08's and I've racked up a few miles on his

the thing I'll really be watching is the off camber areas.

Well congrats and have fun breaking it it!!! Looking forward to some riding pics!

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