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bobski

2007 Arctic Cat 650 H1 Smoking

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New to this forum. From what Ive read in the past very helpful. My 07 650 smoking blue, thinking about changing jug to 700. Has anyone out there done this yet. I figure if I have to rebuild might as well go bigger.

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Too much oil, worn piston rings, worn valve guides, valve seals will all cause a oil burning problem. Time for a complete upper end job. Good luck and let us know what is\was the problem.

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Welcome to QUADCRAZY! Yes, definately comsuming oil if it's blue smoke. How many miles/hours on it?

* Added year and manufacturer to thread title.

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I have a 700 BBK in mine and love it! Give speedwerks a call and they should have everything.

There is also a 750 kit out there but you need the top end from a 700H1.

The only issue I am having right now it that I go through one starter a year with the new HC piston and cam.

Feel free to ask any questions as you are ordering the stuff.

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I'm really interested in 700 bbk. Is there machinig or just a matter of swaping out parts. Assuming valves and valve train are ok.

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No I'm not that Bob Ski. I'm out of binghamton NY. Hope you can still help. I looked at the kit at speed werx. Which comp. ratio do you have? I was thinking I would go with 11:1 and ad cam at a later date.

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I may be up your way riding this weekend. And of course the Hallstead Poker run is coming up soon. If you ever want to get out on one of the rides let me know.

Here is a list of the mods that I have done to mine to give you some ideas, same quad as yours.

2007 Arctic Cat 650 H1 4x4 Automatic LE (Marsh Green)

Tires: Trail: Mud Lite XTR 27x9-12 Front and 27x11-12 Rear / Mud: Highlifter Outlaws 29.5x12-12 Front and Rear w/ 1" Spacers.

Tuning: 2" Dual Intake Snorkel, Updated Airbox, Duckbill Mod, Black Magic Slip On, Exhaust Snorkel (Bolt On).

Clutching: /// Airdam Stage 3, EPI Red Spring.

Motor: Speedwerx 700 BBK, Webcam, 11:1 CP Piston, Coolant Overflow Tank Vented Near Pod, Radiator Racked, Cap on Carb Drain.

Suspension: Sway Bar, Hockey Puck Mod, All Balls Wheel Bearings and Tie Rods, EBC Brakes and Rotors.

Electrical: Odyssey PC680, Auto Meter Temp and Volt Gauge, 4" PIAA Lights, Super-Bright Red LED Taillight Bulb, Circuit Breaker for Fan and Main.

Accessories: Custom Graphics by Arctic FX, Hunter Green PowerMadd Star Series Handguards

Herculiner on Racks, Bumpers, Snorkels, and Radiator Mount, D Ring Tow Hook and Strap

Snow: 60-IN. AC Plow Blade - Modified, Remote Angle Control, and Winter Front

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Thanks for the info. Maybe in near future or hallstead poker run(went last year first time) I can get to talk to you. Where about this weekend? Lots flooded here. Was at lost trails 8/29. Good ride.

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A lot of low speed operation can cause a build up of excess carbon on the top of the piston, rings and valves. it will stick the rings in the piston.

Yamaha Marine Group Has a product I have used several time with positive results. The product name is RingFree. It has two mixture ratios, the first is called a shock treatment and the mixture is one once to one gallon of gas and the second is a maintence mixture of one once to ten gallons.

What the product does is loosen the built up carbon in the combustion chamber and romove it. The shock treatment gets the carbon cleaned out and the maintence treatment keeps it out.

Run one tank at shock level and two to three tanks at maintenance and monitor your smoke and oil consumption. If the problem is due to carbon build up this stuff will clear it up. A pint bottle is about $20.00, That will do a shock and several maintenance tanks.

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