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Ajmboy

Women Behind The Wheel

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Hey Mr. Moderator,,,,Feel free to Use the Correct Forum...:laugh:

I thought I did, this is the Picture and Video Forum...it's not a G-Spot vid...:unsure:

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It IS in this forum becasue I moved it here from the General ATV section...:wink:

wow. youre good.

wait...is that your head? it looks like it might explode from that compliment :) :)

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Check out #1, at least shes wearing a helmet.

[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5xyn-9cn0nE]YouTube - top 10 women drivers of the year[/ame]

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      Here's a good article and video on the basics when it comes to ATV front end wheel alignments.
      Source: http://www.cyclepedia.com/manuals/online/free/steering/atv-front-end-alignment/
      When you hear the words front end alignment what comes to mind? Automobiles and potholes may be the first thought. There are other four wheeled vehicles out there running over a lot more than potholes. ATVs and side-by-sides live hard lives crawling over rocks, hauling loads, and crossing trails no other man-made vehicle would dare.
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      The first step in checking the toe-in is to check the tire pressure. Make sure the tire pressure set correctly in all four tires. The air pressure in the front tires should be as close to the same as possible. Place the vehicle on a level surface and position the steering straight ahead. Be sure to check with the appropriate service manual to see if there are any extra specifics for the vehicle. The Suzuki Eiger for example calls for the vehicle to be weighted as to simulate the rider.

      Make a chalk mark on the front, center of each front tire at the height of the front axle. If available set up a toe gauge so that the pointers line up with the chalk marks.

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      Check out this additional video on ATV wheel alignments:
       
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